Life Science Customers Satisfied But Not Always Brand Loyal to Their Lab Suppliers

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In general, customer satisfaction levels with leading life science suppliers are relatively high. However, five companies stood out with the highest levels of both satisfaction and brand loyalty -- Eppendorf, Millipore (NYSE:MIL), New England Biolabs, Qiagen (NASDAQ:QGEN), and Sigma-Aldrich (NASDAQ:SIAL). Customers of these top suppliers are both more satisfied and more loyal, indicating that they are likely to buy more and remain customers longer. Given the relatively high satisfaction levels across a number of leading brands, customer satisfaction is not sufficient to retain and build brand loyalty.

The other reason - customer's lack of familiarity with a product - can actually be used to the supplier's advantage. Technical support staff can transform these requests into opportunities to raise customer engagement levels by helping scientists learn more about their products and their applications.

    BioInformatics, LLC - an Arlington, VA-based market research and consulting firm - surveyed over 1,100 life scientists around the world regarding their experiences with the customer service and technical support of 29 leading life science brands. The resulting report, Customer Satisfaction & Loyalty in the Life Sciences: Boosting Profit Through Exceptional Service & Support (http://www.gene2drug.com/report/166/), details how suppliers can deliver real value for their customers through their service and support offerings, ultimately building satisfying customer relationships and earning unwavering brand loyalty.

By asking scientists about their expectations of service and support, the report compares the performance of the top life science companies in 11 critical categories, including Net Promoter Score, and other measurements of brand perceptions, emotional attachment and brand loyalty. The survey data is also analyzed to show how emotionally attached and engaged scientists are with different life science brands. This analysis is used to highlight profitable customers who also act as an extension of a company's sales force by promoting a brand to their colleagues. In addition, the 125+ page report also details the most common reasons scientists require service and support, what they expect from their suppliers and where their needs are not currently being met.

For example, the report assessed the customer service and technical support needs of life scientists and found that the primary reasons that scientists contact customer service departments are because of failures in a supplier's supply chain.

"Five of the six top reasons scientists need post-sales assistance from suppliers are completely preventable by the supplier," noted Dr. Tamara Zemlo, Director of Syndicated Research at BioInformatics. "The other reason - customer's lack of familiarity with a product - can actually be used to the supplier's advantage. Technical support staff can transform these requests into opportunities to raise customer engagement levels by helping scientists learn more about their products and their applications."

Scientists are especially demanding customers who expect superior service and support from their life science suppliers. "Traditional customer satisfaction surveys and even NPS programs don't go far enough in understanding the connection between meeting a customer's needs and building an emotional bond with a customer," says Zemlo. "When a scientist connects on an emotional level with a brand it's a more difficult decision for them to switch to a competitor."

For a complimentary Executive Summary of this report, please visit http://www.gene2drug.com/reports.

ABOUT BIOINFORMATICS, LLC

BioInformatics, LLC is the premier research and consulting firm serving the life science tools industry. By leveraging our global online panel of tens of thousands of biomedical researchers, we have supported more than 300 companies and provided insights that lead to better business decisions. Our assignments include assessing the size and attractiveness of markets, optimizing product configurations and pricing, validating corporate acquisitions, measuring customers' brand loyalty, and evaluating brand strength and positioning.

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Amanda Donathen
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