Catching Cyber-Criminals By Thinking Like Them

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This December, representatives from a number of international, federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies will be learning to think like hackers by becoming hackers. Representatives from various industries and corporations will be present as well. All will be immersed in the techniques and methodologies used by cyber-criminals throughout the world.

Too many people lack adequate protection for their home computers, such as current anti-virus/anti-spyware software and a secure firewall. Many keep sensitive information on their unprotected computers, making the information easy prey for criminals.

The Washington State High Technology Crime Investigation Association will be holding 60 hours of intense training during the week of December 11 through 15, approximately 20 miles north of Seattle Washington at Edmonds Community College. The course will be instructed by digital forensic and information security expert Steve Hailey, who also instructs at the college. The course will culminate with all students taking the Certified Ethical Hacker certification test.

"The training could not have been more timely, with consumers using their PC's to purchase billions of goods over the Internet this holiday season - many will become victims of cyber-crime," said Steve Hailey. "Too many people lack adequate protection for their home computers, such as current anti-virus/anti-spyware software and a secure firewall. Many keep sensitive information on their unprotected computers, making the information easy prey for criminals."

The Certified Ethical Hacker training course will teach the techniques used by hackers and intruders to infiltrate, control and compromise computer systems. It will also prepare students to conduct vulnerability assessments and penetration tests of computer systems - finding, documenting and rectifying security problems before hackers can exploit and take advantage of them. In short, the course takes students into the minds of hackers, enabling them to see things from the hackers' perspective. For digital forensic analysts and other professionals involved in combating computer- related crime, the knowledge gained from the training will go a long way in helping to pinpoint what happened, when it happened and who was involved.

"The key to catching cyber-criminals is learning to get inside their heads and start thinking like them," said Hailey. Cyber-criminals are using increasingly sophisticated tactics to defraud consumers and businesses, including online identity theft, phishing scams, malicious code attacks and the creation of botnets. Those fighting computer related crime need to know first hand how these attacks are perpetrated, and the evidence to look for. Keeping current by attending this training is one of the best weapons. "

For more information on the Washington State High Technology Crime Investigation Association, visit:

http://www.wahtcia.org

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Michael Andrew

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