Dallas Museum of Art’s Center for Creative Connections Gives Visitors an Interactive and Inventive Way to Connect with Works of Art

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The current exhibition, Encountering Space, includes 11 key works drawn exclusively from the DMA’s global collections.

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The Center for Creative Connections has become a national model for interactive arts education, and a hub within our institution. … Its exhibitions showcase important works of art from our collections in an interactive environment.

The Center for Creative Connections (C3) in the Dallas Museum of Art is an interactive and innovative learning environment at the heart of the Museum’s galleries where museum-goers can explore their own creativity and discover new ways of experiencing and connecting with art. The current exhibition, Encountering Space, includes 11 key works drawn exclusively from the DMA’s global collections, video labels instead of printed text, and a rotating series of special interactive installations and activities, such as the Space Bar for art creation and the community partner response project, a special installation by Skyline Architecture Cluster of Dallas, Texas.

“Since its opening in 2008, the Center for Creative Connections has become a national model for interactive arts education, and a hub within our institution. It is with great pride that I can say that one out of every three visitors to the Museum participates in the experiences offered within C3,” said Susan Diachisin, The Kelli and Allen Questrom Director of the Center for Creative Connections at the Dallas Museum of Art. “Its exhibitions showcase important works of art from our collections in an interactive environment, encouraging the visitor to respond and engage directly with works on view.”

Encountering Space explores how artists shape and define space in their work. This is the second exhibition to be presented in the DMA’s C3 and will be on view through August 2012. In addition to the exhibition, special programming for children, families, and adults will be held in C3’s Art Studio, Tech Lab and Theater including weekly Artistic Encounters, Creativity Showdowns during the DMA’s monthly Late Nights, and Arturo’s Nest and the Young Learners galleries – areas for families to learn and play.

To discover all of the ways to utilize the Center for Creative Connections watch our video on YouTube.

About the Center for Creative Connections
The Center for Creative Connections (C3) is an innovative learning gallery designed to encourage visitors of all ages to have creative, educational experiences with works of art from the Museum’s collections. Centrally located on the Museum’s first floor, C3’s expansive 12,000-square-foot space includes an exhibition gallery and several distinct learning areas, including an Art Studio, an interactive learning space for children under the age of four called Arturo’s Nest, a Young Learners Gallery for children 5–8 and their families, a theater and a Tech Lab. In its inaugural year, C3 hosted more than 150,000 visitors and engaged approximately 30% of all Museum visitors in direct and hands-on learning experiences.

About the Dallas Museum of Art
Located in the vibrant Arts District of downtown Dallas, Texas, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) ranks among the leading art institutions in the country and is distinguished by its innovative exhibitions and groundbreaking educational programs. At the heart of the Museum and its programs is its global collection, which encompasses more than 24,000 works and spans 5,000 years of history, representing a full range of world cultures. Established in 1903, the Museum welcomes approximately 600,000 visitors annually and acts as a catalyst for community creativity, engaging people of all ages and backgrounds with a diverse spectrum of programming, from exhibitions and lectures to concerts, literary readings, and dramatic and dance presentations.

The Dallas Museum of Art is supported in part by the generosity of Museum members and donors and by the citizens of Dallas through the City of Dallas/Office of Cultural Affairs and the Texas Commission on the Arts.

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