Deep Rock Water Co. Advises Summer Travelers: Water can Help Cure Jet Lag and Altitude Sickness

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Travelers this summer can reduce the effects of jetlag and altitude sickness with a simple, non prescription remedy they can get anywhere: water. According to Deep Rock Water Company in Denver (http://www.deeprockwater.com), which has been providing pure, healthful artesian water to homes and offices in the West and Midwest for more than a century, keeping hydrated has been proven to be a valuable tactic in fighting fatigue and nausea during travel through multiple time zones and stays at high altitudes.

Drink eight ounces of water right after passing through security, and save another eight ounces or more to drink as soon as you are on the plane. An added benefit: all that water in your system will force you out of your seat and down the aisle for a little in-flight exercise.

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Travelers this summer can reduce the effects of jetlag and altitude sickness with a simple, non prescription remedy they can get anywhere: water.

According to Deep Rock Water Company in Denver (http://www.deeprockwater.com), which has been providing pure, healthful artesian water to homes and offices in the West and Midwest for more than a century, keeping hydrated has been proven to be a valuable tactic in fighting fatigue and nausea during travel through multiple time zones and stays at high altitudes.

In fact, research shows keeping hydrated is the most important part of avoiding jetlag. The humidity in the aircraft hovers around 15%. Compare that with the humidity in the world’s driest place, the Atacama Desert, where it hovers around 16%.

Rule of thumb: Drinking 8 ounces of water every hour only replaces the cup of water you’re losing from your skin surface.

“While first class passengers get drinks the second they sit down, in coach you start to become dehydrated by the time the plane taxis to the runway,” says Tom Schwein, President and CEO of Deep Rock Water Company, who is also an avid outdoorsman and runner. “Drink eight ounces of water right after passing through security, and save another eight ounces or more to drink as soon as you are on the plane. An added benefit: all that water in your system will force you out of your seat and down the aisle for a little in-flight exercise.”

Whether you are gearing up for a trek in the Himalayas or warming up for cycling in the Rockies, statistics show you should be prepared for the possible onset of altitude sickness, otherwise known as acute mountains sickness (AMS) or "soroche". High altitudes are stressful on the body, and decreased oxygen levels up high can produce debilitating effects and ruin your holiday.

Among the accepted remedies: drink plenty of water. What you might think is altitude sickness might actually be dehydration, caused by the higher rate of water vapor lost from the lungs at higher altitudes. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, as these can increase the likelihood of dehydration. If it's humid and you're losing a lot of water through perspiration, maintain an electrolyte balance with sports drinks targeted specifically for this purpose, and again, lots of water.

And, no matter where your vacation destination this summer, be sure to call ahead or ask your travel agent to certify that your resort or hotel has commercial-grade systems purifying the water you will be drinking on site and taking with you on your local adventures.

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