80,000+ Amputations Per Year Could be Prevented

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A procedure developed by Dr. A. Lee Dellon of the Dellon Institutes (http://www.DellonInstitutes.com) was recently highlighted at an annual meeting of the American Diabetic Association causing global excitement for all persons suffering from diabetic neuropathy and other nerve disorders. The procedure could ultimately eliminate the need for amputation and eases or eliminates pain without drugs.

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Over 80,000 amputations per year related to diabetic neuropathy could be stopped by application of the basic science and clinical principles of Dr. Dellon

A procedure developed by Dr. A. Lee Dellon of the Dellon Institutes (http://www.DellonInstitutes.com) may prevent more than 80,000 amputations per year. People who suffer from diabetic neuropathy, a complication that comes from diabetes, develop severe pain and numbness in their limbs, and are at risk of amputation. There are 90,000 amputations yearly in the United States.

“Over 80,000 amputations per year related to diabetic neuropathy could be stopped by application of the basic science and clinical principles of Dr. Dellon,” according to Dr. Bruce Shafiroff, a Plastic Surgeon from Syracuse, New York. At a recent American Diabetes Association session in Washington D.C., Shafiroff was referring to A. Lee Dellon, MD, Peripheral Nerve Surgeon, and Professor at Johns Hopkins University. The Dellon Triple Nerve decompression procedure, performed on diabetics suffering from pain and numbness in the legs and feet, not only has an 80% success rate for pain relief and recovery of nerve sensation, but also can prevent amputation. One in six with diabetic neuropathy will develop an ulcer on their foot, and one of six with an ulcer will require amputation. Dr Dellon reports that since he has begun this surgery in the 1980's not one of his patients has had an ulcer or an amputation.

Surgical treatment of nerve compression usually involves decompression (neurolysis) of the nerves that are being compressed. The surgeon opens the tight area through which the nerve passes by dividing a ligament or fibrous band that crosses the nerve. This gives the nerve more room, allows proper blood flow, and permits the nerve to glide easily with movements of nearby joints. The surgery is done as an outpatient procedure, and the patient walks immediately after surgery in a bulky supportive bandage.

Dr. Shafiroff reported his own observations on a series of more than 300 patients with diabetes for whom he has done Dellon’s surgical approach, indicating his success rate for pain relief and recovery of sensation was better than 80%.

Furthermore, in a prospective, multicenter, study available on line at http:/http://www. NeuropathyRegistry.com, 36 surgeons have accrued 524 diabetic patients with 737 operations (about 40% have had bilateral Dellon Triple Nerve decompressions), which confirm the relief of pain, sensory recovery, and prevention of new ulcers and new amputations.

Dr. Dellon indicating that there was “plenty of evidence”, basic science and clinical, that decompression of superimposed nerves in the patient with symptoms of diabetic neuropathy could bring the patient relief and change the natural history of diabetic neuropathy for those patients. For more information, please contact Dr. A. Lee Dellon of the Dellon Institutes, (877) 335-5661.

Reference Links:

Dellon Institutes: http://www.DellonInstitutes.com
American Diabetic Association Report: http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=3845

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