Cast a Vote for Good Oral Hygiene

Delta Dental Wonders: Will the American People Elect Mouthrinse to Their Bathroom Cabinets this Dental Hygiene Month?

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... mouthrinse has long campaigned on a cosmetic platform of simply reducing or eliminating bad breath and making your mouth feel fresh.

Oak Brook, Ill. (PRWEB) October 23, 2012

Fellow citizens: For most Americans, a toothbrush, a tube of toothpaste and a spool of dental floss are long-standing incumbents in their bathroom cabinets.

During Dental Hygiene Month, another candidate, mouthrinse (also known as mouthwash), is vying for a spot beside the aforementioned daily use products. Should it be welcomed to join this exclusive club?

For its part, mouthrinse has long campaigned on a cosmetic platform of simply reducing or eliminating bad breath and making your mouth feel fresh. The cosmetic mouthrinse caucus has a large and loyal following. People who use it like that it eliminates bad breath, morning mouth and pesky food particles when used after meals, and that it promises to meld easily into their morning or evening routine. These are noble ideals.

More recently, a new ideology, therapeutic mouthrinse, has tried to distance itself from the cosmetic party line. Therapeutic mouthrinse has on its slate active ingredients like fluoride to fight cavities, and anti-microbial agents (such as hydrogen peroxide) to combat plaque, gingivitis and other gum diseases.

Every candidate has its critics, however, and mouthrinse is no different. Some point out that cosmetic mouthwash has too limited an agenda, that it just masks bad breath but doesn’t reduce cavities, gingivitis or plaque. Others have questioned the harmful effects of some mouthrinse products’ high concentration of alcohol content (ranging anywhere from 6.6 percent to 26.9 percent). A small but vocal contingent believes that factor could be a risk for oral cancer, but so far the overall evidence does not support that conclusion.

These criticisms have led mouthwash to position itself as a dental hygiene populist product that can appeal to all people, introducing non-alcoholic varieties to please even the harshest critics. It has also rolled out exciting new flavors (like cinnamon, bubblegum and orange) to appeal to a block of voters who want fresh breath but desire more than just the taste of mint.

“Mouthrinses are not a substitute for brushing or flossing but they might be a useful addition to your daily oral hygiene routine,” said Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, a mouthrinse campaign expert and Delta Dental’s vice president for dental science and policy. “At a minimum, most mouthrinses will at least provide temporary relief from bad breath. People should check with their dentist if bad breath persists or to see if they would benefit from a mouthrinse that has fluoride or anti-bacterial agents to protect against cavities or periodontal diseases.”

About Delta Dental Plans Association
The not-for-profit Delta Dental Plans Association (http://www.deltadental.com), based in Oak Brook, Ill., is the leading national network of independent dental service corporations. It provides dental benefits programs to more than 60 million Americans in more than 97,000 employee groups throughout the country. For more oral health news and information from Dr. Kohn and DDPA, subscribe to our blog and follow us on Twitter.

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