Dickinson College to Host Conference on Public Service

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Ex-U.S. Deputy Attorney General, Intelligent Design Trial Judge among Speakers

James B. Comey, former Deputy Attorney General of the United States

Shari's Politics: Cultural and Policy Implications of Movements for and Against Islamic Law

James B. Comey, the former U.S. deputy attorney general who was at the center of prominent and controversial cases in the Bush administration, and U.S. Middle District Judge John E. Jones III, who presided over the landmark intelligent design trial in Harrisburg, Pa., are among the featured speakers and panelists who will participate in the day-long conference on public service at Dickinson College Monday, Feb. 23.

The conference -- "What's wrong with public service? A challenge for higher education" -- will be held in the Stern Center Great Room on West Louther Street between West and North College streets in Carlisle. It is free and open to the public.

Other participants in the program include R. Nicholas Burns, former undersecretary of state for political affairs, retired Admiral Gregory "Grog" Johnson, former commander of U.S. Naval Forces in Europe, and Hollister Knowlton Petraeus, director of the BBB Military Line and wife of Gen. David H. Petraeus, head of U.S. Central Command.

In 2003, Comey appointed Patrick Fitzgerald as independent counsel in the Central Intelligence Agency leak case, leading to the perjury conviction of Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis Libby Jr. In 2004, Comey intervened at the bedside of Attorney General John Ashcroft to prevent two top officials -- White House Counsel Alberto R. Gonzalez and President Bush's Chief of Staff, Andrew H. Card Jr. -- from trying to persuade Ashcroft, who was in intensive care, from reauthorizing the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance program. Gonzalez served as attorney general from 2005 to 2007, and in 2006 oversaw the dismissal of seven U.S. attorneys.

In 2005, Judge Jones - a 1977 Dickinson graduate - presided over the landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover (Pa.) School District, after which he ruled that it was unconstitutional to teach intelligent design within a public school science curriculum. He also ruled that intelligent design was not science but instead is form of creationism.

Here are the scheduled programs, followed by biographies of the participants:

8:30 - 9:15 a.m.    Presidential Panel

President William G. Durden, Dickinson College; President Robert A. Kennedy, University of Maine; and President Mark D. Gearan, Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

9:30 - 10:45 a.m.    Public Service and the Curriculum - panel discussion

Stanley N. Katz, professor, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University; Susan J. Hunter, vice president for academic affairs and provost, University of Maine; and Chris Myers Asch, founder and advocate of a U.S. Public Service Academy. Moderator: Neil B. Weissman, provost and dean of Dickinson College.

11:00 - noon         A Call to Public Service

Address by R. Nicholas Burns, professor, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and former undersecretary of state for political affairs.

1:30 - 2:45 p.m.    Why Public Service?

Address by James B. Comey, senior vice president and general counsel Lockheed Martin Corp., and former deputy attorney general of the United States.

3:00 - 4:30 p.m.    The Pros and Cons of Public Service - panel discussion

Admiral Gregory G. Johnson, Navy (Ret.); U.S. Middle District Judge John E. Jones III; and Hollister Knowlton Petraeus, director, BBB Military Line. Moderator: Daniel D. Churchill, chairman of the board of advisers, School of Policy and International Affairs, University of Maine.

4:30 - 5:00 p.m.    Summary and Next Steps

Bahman Baktiari, director, School of Policy and International Affairs, University of Maine; and H. L. Pohlman, executive director, Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College.

The conference is sponsored by Dickinson College and the University of Maine and presented by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College. For information, visit http://www.clarkeforum.org or call 717-234-1875.

Speaker Biographies

Chris Asch, founder and advocate of the U.S. Public Service Academy.

Asch co-founded the Sunflower County Freedom Project in 1998 and served as executive director until launching the U.S. Public Service Academy in 2006. He is a graduate of Duke University with a doctorate in American history from the University of North Carolina. He taught elementary and middle school for three years in Sunflower, Mississippi, as part of Teach for America/AmeriCorps and one year in Taejon, South Korea, with the William J. Fulbright program. He won the 2007 Eli Segal Award from AmeriCorps Alums and became a 2007 Echoing Green Fellow. His first book, "The Senator and the Sharecropper: The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer," was released in May 2008.

Bahman Baktiari, director of the School of Policy and International Affairs, University of Maine

Baktiari received his doctoral degree from the Woodrow Wilson Department of Government and Foreign Affairs at the University of Virginia. His most recent work is "Globalization and Religion," published last year. His forthcoming chapter, "Shari'a Politics and The Transformation of Islamic Law in Iran," will be published in 2010 in Robert Hefner's "Shari's Politics: Cultural and Policy Implications of Movements for and Against Islamic Law" Princeton University Press). He was the chief organizer of two major international conferences in 2007: "Globalization in the 21st Century: How Interconnected is the World?" in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and "Nuclear Weapons and the Middle East Region: A New Round of Proliferation?" in Washington, D.C.

R. Nicholas Burns, former undersecretary of state for political affairs

Burns is professor in the practice of diplomacy and international politics at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is also a member of the board of directors of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the Atlantic Council, the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress and the Appeal of Conscience Foundation. Burns served in the U.S. Foreign Service for 27 years until his retirement in April 2008. He was undersecretary of state for political affairs from 2005 to 2008, the nation's highest-ranking career diplomat. In this position, he led negotiations on Iran, India, Kosovo and many other issues and oversaw U.S. diplomatic efforts in each region of the world. Prior to that, he was U.S. ambassador to NATO from 2001 to 2005 and ambassador to Greece from 1997 to 2001. During his career in the State Department, he was spokesman for Secretaries of State Madeleine Albright and Warren Christopher (1995-97). He also served for five years (1990-95) at the White House during the collapse of the Soviet Union where he was special assistant to the president for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia Affairs and a member of the National Security Council staff. Burns also served in the American Consulate General in Jerusalem in 1985-87 when he coordinated U.S. economic assistance to the Palestinian people in the West Bank, and at the American Embassies in Egypt and Mauritania. He has received honorary doctorates from 10 American universities (including Dickinson College, where in 2007 he delivered the commencement address), the Secretary of State's Distinguished Service Award (from Condoleezza Rice), the Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service from the Johns Hopkins University and the Boston College Alumni Achievement Award. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Order of Saint John and Red Sox Nation. Burns has a bachelor's in history from Boston College and a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He also earned the Certificat Pratique de Langue Francaise at the Sorbonne in 1977.

Daniel D. Churchill, chairman of the board of advisers, School of Policy and International Affairs, University of Maine

Churchill worked for 23 years in Europe -- 15 in London, five in Brussels and three in Frankfurt -- and has also worked in several locations in the United States. His last position, from which he retired in 1998, was vice president, finance, of Avis Europe PLC. He also was director or managing director of seven related finance and insurance companies. He directed or coordinated the financing of several hundred companies in Europe, Africa and Asia. Prior to commencing his career in finance in 1972, he was employed in U.S. Intelligence at the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of the Air Force and served on active duty in the USAF as first lieutenant. He earned his master's degree with high honors from Boston University in 1972, and a bachelor's degree in engineering and physics from the University of Maine in 1963.

James B. Comey, former deputy attorney general of the United States

Comey served as deputy attorney general of the United States from 2003 to 2005, when he joined Lockheed Martin as a senior vice president and general counsel. As deputy attorney general, he oversaw many important and controversial government cases, including terrorism and securities fraud prosecutions. In 2003, he appointed Patrick Fitzgerald as independent counsel in the Central Intelligence Agency leak case, leading to the perjury conviction of Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis Libby Jr. In 2004, he intervened at the bedside of Attorney General John Ashcroft to prevent two top officials -- White House Counsel Alberto R. Gonzalez and President Bush's Chief of Staff, Andrew H. Card Jr. -- from trying to persuade Ashcroft, who was in intensive care, from reauthorizing the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance program. Gonzalez served as attorney general from 2005 to 2007, and in 2006 oversaw the dismissal of seven U.S. attorneys. In 2007, Comey testified before Congress on the U.S. attorney dismissal scandal, contradicting assertions by Gonzalez that the firings had been due to poor performance on the part of some of the dismissed prosecutors. Comey previously served as United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, where he had earlier been an assistant U.S. attorney and lead prosecutor in the highly publicized United States v. John Gambino racketeering and murder trial. From 1996 through 2001, he was managing assistant U.S. attorney in charge of the Richmond Division of the U.S. Attorney's office for the Eastern District of Virginia. In that position, he handled the Khobar Towers terrorist bombing case, arising out of the June 1996 attack on a U.S. military facility in Saudi Arabia in which 19 United States Air Force members were killed and hundreds wounded. Comey has also worked in commercial litigation, having been a partner with the law firm of McGuireWoods, LLP. He is a 1982 graduate of the College of William & Mary and earned his law degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 1985.

William G. Durden, president, Dickinson College

Durden has been president of Dickinson College since 1999. He received his undergraduate degree from Dickinson College in German and philosophy in 1971 and earned master's and doctoral degrees in German Language and Literature from The Johns Hopkins University. After graduating from Dickinson, he received a Fulbright scholarship to study at the University of Basle, Switzerland. He serves as chair of the advisory board of the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars (the senior Fulbright program), as a member of the board of trustees of the Institute of International Education and as a member of the Washington Center's Council of Presidents.

Mark D. Gearan, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Gearan, appointed president in 1999, serves on the boards of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, the Corporation for National and Community Service, The Partnership of Public Service and as Chair of the Annapolis Group. He is also a member of the Leadership Council of ServiceNation. He is the past chair of the National Campus Compact. Gearan previously served at the White House as assistant to the president and director of communications, as well as deputy chief of staff during the Clinton administration. During the 1992 presidential campaign, he was Al Gore's campaign manager, segueing to the position of deputy director of President-elect Clinton's transition team. A native of Gardner, Mass., Gearan earned his bachelor's degree (cum laude) in government at Harvard University and his law degree at Georgetown University.
Susan J. Hunter, vice president for academic affairs and provost, University of Maine

Hunter began her career at the University of Maine in 1991 and is the vice president for academic affairs and provost, a position she has held since May 2008. Prior to her present position, she served as associate provost and dean for undergraduate education, assistant director in the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture and as a faculty member and chair of the department of biological sciences. Over the years, she taught basic biology, cell biology and anatomy and physiology and had grant support from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. She is a cell biologist whose research focused on structural and functional aspects of bone cell biology. She received her bachelor's degree in biology from James Madison University and fulfilled the practicum requirements in medical technology at Duke University Medical Center. She received her doctorate in physiology from The Pennsylvania State University and did post-doctoral work at Case Western Reserve University and The Pennsylvania State University.

Admiral Gregory "Grog" Johnson (retired), United States Navy

Admiral Johnson assumed duties as commander of U.S. Naval Forces in Europe and commander in chief of Allied Forces in Southern Europe in 2001. He retired from active duty in 2004. He served as executive assistant to the chairman of the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and prior to this, he was the head of the European Command/Central Command Branch of the Joint Operations Division, Operations Directorate. In 1997 he was the senior military assistant to the deputy secretary of defense and was subsequently assigned as the senior military assistant to the secretary of defense in 1999. He assumed command of the U.S. Sixth Fleet and Naval Striking and Support Forces Southern Europe in 2000, a position he held until his promotion in 2001. His decorations and awards include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal (with three Bronze Oak Leafs), Navy Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (with two Gold Stars), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (with two Gold Stars), NATO Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, and various service and campaign awards. He graduated from the University of Maine in 1968 with a bachelor's degree in political science. He was commissioned in 1969 following aviation officer candidate school, and designated a naval aviator in 1970.

John E. Jones III, U.S. district judge, Middle District of Pennsylvania

A 1977 Dickinson College graduate, Jones earned his law degree from the Dickinson School of Law of The Pennsylvania State University. He was appointed United States District judge in 2002. In 2003 he struck down portions of Shippensburg University's speech code on the basis that they violated the First Amendment's free speech guarantee. In that same year he ruled--in a decision later affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court-- that the U.S. Department of Agriculture's statute assessing milk producers in order to fund advertising, including the "got milk" campaign, did not infringe the free speech rights of the producers. In 2005 he presided over the landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover School District, after which he held that it was unconstitutional to teach intelligent design within a public school science curriculum. In 2006 he ruled that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's ballot access procedures for minor political parties did not violate the Constitution. Prior to taking the bench, Jones had numerous public and private affiliations. These included service as Pennsylvania state attorney for the D.A.R.E. program (Drug Abuse Resistance Education), and as chairman of a local foundation which awarded scholarships to high school students based upon vocal music ability. In 1994, Pennsylvania Governor-elect Tom Ridge named Jones as a co-chair of his transition team. A year later, Ridge nominated Jones to serve as chairman of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, a position he held for seven years until his appointment as judge.

Stanley N. Katz, president emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies and professor, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University.

Katz graduated from Harvard University in 1955 with a major in English history and literature, and earned his doctorate in early American history from Harvard in 1961. He attended Harvard Law School in 1969-70. His recent research focuses upon the relationship of civil society and constitutionalism to democracy, and upon the relationship of the United States to the international human rights regime. Formerly Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law and Liberty at Princeton University, Katz is a scholar of American legal and constitutional history, and on philanthropy and non-profit institutions. He is the editor of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise "History of the Supreme Court of the United States" and of the forthcoming "Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History." The author and editor of numerous books and articles, he has served as president of the Organization of American Historians and the American Society for Legal History and as vice president of the Research Division of the American Historical Association. He is a member of the board of trustees of the Newberry Library, the Copyright Clearance Center and numerous other institutions. He is vice president of the International Society for Cultural Property and a commissioner of the National Historic Publications and Records Commission. He also serves as chair of the American Council of Learned Societies/Social Science Research Council Working Group on Cuba. Katz is a member of the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the American Antiquarian Society, the American Philosophical Society; a Fellow of the American Society for Legal History, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Society of American Historians; a corresponding member of the Massachusetts Historical Society and an Academico Correspondiente of the Cuban Academy of Sciences. He has honorary degrees from several universities.

Robert A. Kennedy, president, University of Maine

Kennedy became the University of Maine's 18th president in 2005. He arrived at university in 2000, first serving as executive vice president for academic affairs and provost, followed by an eight-month stint as interim president. He graduated from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, in 1968 and earned his doctorate in botany from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1974. He began his academic career on the faculty of the University of Iowa, followed by faculty and administrative appointments at Washington State University, The Ohio State University, the University of Maryland and Texas A&M University. Immediately before coming to the University of Maine, he served for eight years as vice president for research and associate provost for graduate studies at Texas A&M.

Hollister "Holly" Knowlton Petraeus, director, BBB Military Line

Petraeus, a 1974 graduate (summa cum laude) of Dickinson College, is the director of BBB Military Line®, a program of the BBB Center, an educational foundation associated with the Council of Better Business Bureaus Inc. BBB Military Line provides consumer education and advocacy for service members and their families. She is the wife of Gen. David H. Petraeus, the Commander of United States Central Command. Mrs. Petraeus oversees a national program that works with the Department of Defense (DoD) as a partner in the DoD's Financial Readiness Campaign and fosters outreach from the 165 local Better Business Bureaus (BBB) to military communities across the United States. She has made on-site visits to military installations around the United States, working to establish the relationships between local BBB personnel and military authorities. She has guided development of teen and adult curricula taught to more than 12,000 individuals in military communities, publishes a monthly military consumer newsletter, and oversees content posted on six BBB Military Line web sites. A military spouse of 34 years and a former Army civilian employee, Mrs. Petraeus has extensive experience as a volunteer leader in military family programs. In that role she has worked with local, state and national legislators on issues affecting Army families, to include testifying at two U.S. Senate hearings on deployment-related issues. She is a recipient of the Secretary of the Army Public Service Award, the Boy Scouts of America "Service to Families" Award and the Department of the Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal.
H.L. Pohlman, executive director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College
Pohlman holds the A. Lee Fritschler chair in public policy and is executive director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College. He earned his doctorate in political science from Columbia University in 1982. His areas of research specialization include
American constitutional law and political and legal thought. He received a Fulbright distinguished lecturing award to the United Kingdom in 1998. From 1996 to 1998, he was a judicial fellow at the U.S. Supreme Court. He also served as director of the Dickinson College K. Robert Nilsson Center for European Studies in Bologna, Italy during the 1993-94 academic year.

Neil B. Weissman, provost and dean, Dickinson College

Weissman came to Dickinson as an assistant professor of history in 1975 and was appointed dean of the college in 1998. He has served as chair of the department of history, coordinator of the Russian and Soviet Area Studies and East Asian Studies programs, director of the Clarke Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Contemporary Issues and project director for international education. He received his undergraduate degree as valedictorian from Colgate University and holds master's and doctoral degrees in Russian history from Princeton University

Contact:
Denise Robinson
Media Relations
media(at)dickinson.edu
717-245-1289

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