Doe Run Goes West to Share Mining, Recycling Story

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Doe Run metallurgist discusses past, present, future of Missouri mining.

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Without it, our cars wouldn't start, medical services would be impacted, communications would suffer - the world would change dramatically. As producers, we must do our utmost to protect safety, health and the environment - using the best technology available - while providing this vital metal to consumers.

K-12 educators attending the Colorado Mining Association Education Foundation's teacher workshop heard firsthand about the Missouri lead mining, smelting and recycling industry from Matthew Pratt, senior metallurgist for The Doe Run Company's Buick Resource Recycling Division.

Thirty teachers from Colorado, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Texas attended the 40th annual event, which was held at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colo. Pratt's presentation, held July 14, focused on Doe Run's recycling division in Boss, Mo., historical and present-day lead uses and how lead is mined, milled and smelted within Doe Run's Missouri operations. Environmental impacts and health issues were also discussed.

"Thanks to the information shared by Doe Run's Matthew Pratt, teachers participating in the four-week-long program and their current and future students will have a much better understanding of the importance of lead in today's society," said Dan Witkowsky, a metallurgical engineer and course coordinator for the education foundation. "Of special interest to the teachers was how lead - particularly from spent automotive batteries - is recycled and can be used over and over and over again. It's a success story that most of the public has not heard."

According to Pratt, it's important that educators get the full picture about lead so they can share it with their students. BRRD, which opened in 1991, recycles more than 13.5 million lead-acid batteries annually. In addition, BRRD is one of the few facilities in the world that accepts and recovers lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) glass, found in many computer monitors and television screens.

"Lead tends to get a bad rap, but it is a metal that is vital to our everyday lives," Pratt said. "Without it, our cars wouldn't start, medical services would be impacted, communications would suffer - the world would change dramatically. As producers, we must do our utmost to protect safety, health and the environment - using the best technology available - while providing this vital metal to consumers."

Throughout the year, Doe Run's education team visits schools near their facilities and speaks at educational institutions and special events. To learn more about these educational outreach initiatives, visit http://www.doerun.com.

Based in St. Louis, The Doe Run Company is a privately held natural resources company and the largest integrated lead producer in the Western Hemisphere. Dedicated to environmentally responsible mineral and metal production, Doe Run operates one of the world's largest, single-site lead recycling facilities, located in Boss, Mo. The Doe Run Company and its subsidiaries deliver products and services necessary to provide power, protection and convenience. Doe Run has operations in Missouri, Washington and Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.doerun.com.

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Angie Nations

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