Dr. David Williams Scoops National Media on PSA Effectiveness -- by 17 Years

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The reliability of the PSA test is something that Dr. David Williams has been questioning since 1992.

The effectiveness of the ubiquitous PSA test -- in both predicting cancer and saving lives -- was recently scrutinized in articles appearing in the Washington Post and New York Times. The reliability of this test is something that Dr. David Williams has been questioning since 1992.

The PSA test, which measures the level of prostate-specific antigen secreted by the prostate gland, can result in false positives that lead to unnecessary physical intervention. And the studies cited in the articles indicate little-to-no life-saving results based on PSA screenings.

"PSA in itself does not diagnose cancer," said Dr. Williams. "Although cancerous prostate glands do secrete more PSA, when PSA levels are used to diagnose cancer they give incorrect results 25 to 30 percent of the time. Not only do they miss detecting some cancers, they may imply that someone has cancer when he actually doesn't."

Dr. Williams focuses on maintaining a healthy prostate through a combination of natural nutrients that promote healthy prostate tissue and function, as well as normal urinary function and flow, and provide antioxidant protection for the prostate tissue while maintaining a healthy hormonal balance in the body.

Dr. Williams continued, "Mainstream medicine is finally realizing that this test is not the final word on prostate health--and that will be good for men's health. I recognize that most men over age 50 will die with prostate cancer; however, very few will die from it. So we should be focusing on maintaining a healthy prostate through non-invasive measures. Even the test's originator, Dr. Thomas Stamey, acknowledges that the test, while promising in the beginning, is no longer a useful or reliable marker for detecting prostate cancer."

About Dr. Williams:
Dr. David Williams has spent over 25 years in the medical field and is a leading authority on natural healing. He is a graduate of Southwest Texas State University and Texas Chiropractic College. Until 1985, Dr. Williams operated the largest non-invasive alternative medical practice in central Texas. At that time, he devoted his full time and energy to sharing his health discoveries from around the world through his newsletter, Alternatives. Often years ahead of conventional medicine, Dr. Williams was a proponent of a low-fat diet long before the American Heart Association endorsed it; reported on "60 Minutes" about the ability of shark cartilage to reverse cancer growth without side effects; and was among the first to warn about overuse of antibiotics leading to resistant strains of disease. Over 20 years later, Alternatives has been devoted to alternative medicine with more than 230,000 subscribers. To find out more about Dr. Williams, his philosophy, and his supplements, please visit: drdavidwilliams.com.

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