Oklahoma DUI Report Released: Alcohol-related Fatalities in Oklahoma at Five-year High

From 2011 to 2012 Oklahoma saw a concerning seven percent increase in alcohol-related fatalities, even as alcohol-related crashes decline statewide. McIntyre Law examined the latest DUI statistics in Oklahoma and compiled a report on the pervasive issue of Oklahoma alcohol-related crashes.

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Oklahoma Alcohol-Related Fatalities, 2006-2012

Oklahoma Alcohol-Related Fatalities, 2006-2012

The DUI Report is a way for us all to take a critical look at alcohol-related trends in the state. It's been disappointing to report that fatalities are on the rise this year, and we hope that the community can encourage better awareness of this issue.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (PRWEB) February 12, 2014

From 2011 to 2012 Oklahoma saw a concerning seven percent increase in alcohol-related fatalities. At 157, 2006 had the fewest alcohol-related deaths in recent history, followed by 209 in 2009. The steep increase is concerning, and although the number of fatalities has risen between 2006 and 2012, the number of crashes has decreased from 5,442 in 2006 to 4,291 in 2012, meaning that alcohol-related crashes in Oklahoma were deadlier in 2012.

The 2012 DUI Report is the work of over five years of data collection and reporting by the McIntyre Law team. This cumulative look at alcohol-related trends in the state also reveals that over the past five years:

●    Drivers in alcohol-related fatalities have averaged 73% male and 27% female.
●    The majority of alcohol-related fatalities take place on Saturdays and Sundays.
●    Nearly 40% of alcohol-related fatalities happen in places where it is dark (rural roads with poor or no light).
●    Oklahoma and Tulsa counties had the most fatalities statewide, each with over 100 since 2006. Harmon had none and Cimmaron and Harper counties each had two. However, in reviewing the number of fatalities based on the population, Roger Mills County had 243 fatalities per 100,000 people, while Grant and Pushmataha counties each had 139 fatalities per 100,000 people. The counties with the lowest fatality rates per 100,000 people are Harmon, Garfield and Jackson.

"At McIntyre Law we pride ourselves on being part of the community, not just as personal injury attorneys defending those who've been harmed by negligence of another, but as advocates of safety statewide," says Noble McIntyre, senior partner and owner of McIntyre Law. "The DUI Report is a way for us all to take a critical look at alcohol-related trends in the state. It's been disappointing to report that fatalities are again on the rise this year, and we hope that the community can encourage better awareness of this issue."

The report is based on statistics from the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA), Oklahoma Highway Safety Office (OHSO) and the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS).

About McIntyre Law, P.C.
McIntyre Law, P.C. continues to publish this annual report as a way to raise awareness of DUI and its consequences. Our mission is to make Oklahoma’s roads safer and to protect the rights of car accident victims. We provide free, no-obligation consultations to people who have been injured or lost loved ones in drunk driving accidents. For More information regarding drunk driving fatalities, or to view previous years' reports, visit: http://www.oklahoma-law.com/.


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Oklahoma Alcohol-related Gender Statistics Gender related trends

Oklahoma Alcohol-related Gender Statistics


Oklahoma alcohol-related crashes by lighting Lighting in alcohol-related crashes

Oklahoma alcohol-related crashes by lighting