Electrical Energy Storage Technology Within Smart Grid Market Analyzed in New Research Report Available with ReportsnReports.com

“Electrical Energy Storage Technology and its Use Within the Intelligent Grid” says US EIA expects overall global energy consumption to increase by 47% during 2010-2035, with China and India together accounting for half of the growth.

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Dallas, TX (PRWEB) September 15, 2012

This is increasingly presenting a major problem to power suppliers around the world as electrical energy infrastructures in most countries are antiquated, wasteful, and unable to cope with rising demand.

Features and benefits

  •     Analyze existing electrical energy storage technology.
  •     Examine existing smart grid projects and the storage solutions they have employed.
  •     Analyze the renewable energy sector and the issues associated with integrating green power into existing distribution systems.
  •     Assess the problems that can occur when suppliers face unexpected peak demand.
  •     Understand the major drivers behind growing global demand for electrical power.

Highlights

  •     The problem of the intermittent delivery patterns of green energy technology can be solved by storing up power generated during off-peak periods for dispersal at times of greater need. However, the best means of storing energy remains a matter for debate with no definitive one-size-fits-all solution yet established as an industry standard.
  •     The European utility-scale battery market was valued at $126.4m in terms of revenue in 2010 and could be worth as much as $564.9m by 2015. With renewable energy investment increasing rapidly, the demand for battery storage is expected to rise as well.
  •     Along with compressed air energy storage, pumped storage offers the least expensive form of energy storage, with a 1,000MW project costing about $1,500/KW to $2,500/KW, according to the National Hydropower Association in Washington, DC.

Your key questions answered

  •     What are the major smart grid projects and what challenges have they encountered?
  •     What are the different types of battery storage technology available and what are their pros/cons?
  •     What innovations in battery technology still need to take place before they can be used at utility-scale?
  •     To what extent is the renewable energy sector influencing change in electrical energy distribution?
  •     What is the future outlook for smart grid uptake?

Buy your copy of this report @ http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/192271-electrical-energy-storage-technology-and-its-use-within-the-intelligent-grid.html

Table of Contents

About the author

Disclaimer

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  •     The smart grid and its storage needs
  •     Batteries
  •     Water- and hydrogen-based systems
  •     Alternative utility-scale storage systems
  •     The future outlook

The smart grid and its storage needs

  •     Summary
  •     Global electricity demand
  •     Smart grids are a necessity
  •     The energy storage dilemma
  •     Batteries
  •     Hydropower: the main storage system
  •     Other alternatives

Batteries

  •     Summary
  •     Battery market set for rapid growth
  •     Conventional battery types
  •     Lead-acid batteries
  •     Sodium-sulfur
  •     Lithium-ion (li-ion)
  •     Cost is the main obstacle
  •     Flow batteries

Water- and hydrogen-based systems

  •     Summary
  •     Batteries are not the only option
  •     Pumped storage leads the way
  •     Fuel cells are beginning to emerge

Alternative utility-scale storage systems

  •     Summary
  •     Alternative systems come into play
  •     Compressed air energy storage (CAES)
  •     Flywheels are also an option
  •     Molten salt thermal storage
  •     Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES)
The future outlook
  •     Summary
  •     Energy consumption driving demand for storage

Appendix

Glossary/abbreviations

List of Tables
Table: New renewable capacity by power source (GW), 2011
Table: Global energy storage by technology, non-hydro (MW), 2011
Table: Global investment in renewable energy ($bn), 2011
Table: Commercial energy storage systems for renewable integration, 2011
Table: Countries with highest investments in fuel cell technology ($m), 2011
Table: High potential application markets for energy storage (GW), 2011
Table: Projected market for US storage (MW), 2017

List of Figures
Figure: New renewable capacity by power source (GW), 2011
Figure: Global energy storage by technology, non-hydro (MW), 2011
Figure: Global investment in renewable energy ($bn), 2011
Figure: Maximum power of energy storage systems (MW), 2011
Figure: Countries with highest investments in fuel cell technology ($m), 2011
Figure: Molten salt system, 2012
Figure: High potential application markets for energy storage (GW), 2011
Figure: Projected market for US storage (MW), 2017

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