ICAA Offers Eight Tips to Solve America's Energy Crisis

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"Senators John McCain and Barack Obama, the 2008 US presidential candidates, have made renewable energy part of their election platforms, yet America has another energy problem--one that remains virtually ignored," states Colin Milner, CEO of the International Council on Active Aging® (ICAA). "The fact is, millions of Americans in their 50s and beyond lack the energy they need to lead a quality style of life." Milner believes that energy-boosting education and programs are needed throughout the country to combat this personal energy shortage, as lifestyle modifications can help to rectify low energy, fatigue and exhaustion. ICAA's members can help, as they provide fitness and wellness facilities and services for older adults.

The fact is, millions of Americans in their 50s and beyond lack the energy they need to lead a quality style of life.

"Senators John McCain and Barack Obama, the 2008 US presidential candidates, have made renewable energy part of their election platforms, yet America has another energy problem--one that remains virtually ignored," states Colin Milner, CEO of the International Council on Active Aging® (ICAA). "The fact is, millions of Americans in their 50s and beyond lack the energy they need to lead a quality style of life." Milner believes that energy-boosting education and programs are needed throughout the country to combat this personal energy shortage, as lifestyle modifications can help to rectify low energy, fatigue and exhaustion. ICAA's members can help, as they provide fitness and wellness facilities and services for older adults.

A personal energy shortage may be due to a myriad of factors, including poor sleep habits, inactivity, taking care of children and/or parents, poor nutrition, long work hours, drug interactions, stress, depression, and boredom. But lack of energy can also be a precursor to a major health event and should not be taken lightly, stresses Milner. "If you do not feel reenergized by participating in the following energy-boosting activities, seek the advice of a medical professional to ensure that a potentially serious issue has not been overlooked," he recommends.

Eight tips to reenergize your body and mind

1. Improve your sleep habits. Go to bed earlier, don't eat before bedtime, and relax your mind by avoiding sources of stimulation (such as television) for a couple of hours before sleeping.
2. Be physically active for 30 minutes a day, five days a week.
3. Ensure you eat nutritious, energy-building foods, such as whole grains.
4. Become a better manager of your time to avoid long work hours, and traveling to and from work during rush hour. Establish what is important and what is not, and learn how to say no. Learn how to better structure your use of time, to add balance to your life.
5. Work with a medical professional to reduce the number of medications you take and the potential for interactions.
6. Reduce your stress levels through behavior modification classes and by addressing what is causing your stress.
7. Keep your mind, body and spirit active and engaged, so you have meaning in your life and don't get bored and tired.
8. Seek the advice of a wellness or fitness professional to help you prevent, delay, manage or improve ongoing health conditions, which can drain your energy in many instances.

For the next 20 years, the 50-plus population will continue to increase. Efforts to address their needs, including energy, may be just the ticket for success, concludes Milner, a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on the Challenges of Gerontology.

About the International Council on Active Aging®

ICAA is the world's largest association dedicated to changing the way we age by uniting professionals in the retirement, assisted living, recreation, fitness, rehabilitation and wellness fields. The council supports these professionals with education, information, resources and tools, so they can achieve optimal success with the growing population of people who are 50 years and older. As an active-aging educator and advocate, ICAA has advised numerous organizations and governmental bodies, including the US Administration on Aging, the National Institute on Aging (part of the US National Institutes of Health), the US Department of Health and Human Services, Canada's Special Senate Committee on Aging, and the British Columbia Ministry of Health.

For interviews or more information about the ICAA and aging-related issues, contact:

Colin Milner, CEO
International Council on Active Aging
Toll-free: 1-866-335-9777 (North America only)
Telephone: 604-734-4466
Cell: 604-763-4595
Email: colinmilner@icaa.cc
Website: http://www.icaa.cc

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COLIN MILNER


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