Could the Plastic Bag Ban Open the Door for Companies that Produce Environmentally Friendly Products?

Share Article

Companies that produce environmentally friendly products could take advantage of the business opportunities created by the recent plastic bag ban in San Francisco. With other cities and states mulling over the idea of banning plastic bags in supermarkets and pharmacies, small companies that manufacture value-driven products that are recyclable, have little effect on the environment, and can be reused may have opportunities that didn't exist before.

Our plastic wrap has many of the right characteristics for an environmentally friendly shopping bag. It has excellent elastic recovery, requires 25% less material than other plastic wraps, saves machine processing energy, and, unlike other plastic, once biodegradation is complete, all that remains is carbon dioxide, water and inert biomass, all of which are part of the normal bio-cycle.

On the heels of the plastic bag ban in San Francisco and with other cities and states like New York and Los Angeles considering measures to ban plastic grocery bags, companies that produce environmentally friendly products have been presented with a new business opportunity that didn't exist prior to the ban: create an alternative shopping bag that has little effect on the environment.

Though the Environmental Protection Agency has long encouraged shoppers to take resusable bags to the grocery store, a new totally degradable bag remains a plausible option, as both paper and plastic have environmental effects.

Stefan Gudmundsson, CEO of Diamant Film, a company that manufactures products that contain Totally Degradable Plastic Additive (TDPA) Oxo-Biodegradable Technology, commented, "The production and decomposition of both paper and plastic bags have effects on our environment. Plastic is worse in some ways and paper is worse in others. A product that degrades and ultimately biodegrades would be the best alternative."

Paper bags, which are made from trees, are a renewable resource, but paper requires cutting down trees, pulping, bag production, and waste disposal. It also takes four times as much energy to manufacture a paper bag than it does a plastic bag.

Plastic bags; which involve petroleum and natural gas extraction, ethylene manufacture, ethylene polymerization, bag processing, and waste disposal; are a nonrenewable resource and can take up to 1,000 years to degrade. According to the EPA, in a landfill, neither paper bags or plastic bags break down because of a lack of water, light, oxygen and other elements for degradation.

Diamant Film, which produces environmentally friendly products aimed at minimizing pollution, has been manufacturing and selling a plastic wrap for food that is completely recyclable, contains no plasticizer or chlorine, and is non-carcinogenic. The plastic wrap is also the world's first non-PVC polystyrene-based food wrap and has earned the ECO Logo certified by the Environmental ChoiceM Program, North America's leading benchmark of environmentally responsible products and services.

So, could Diamant be a logical choice to manufacture an alternative shopping bag that has little or no effect on the environment? CEO Gudmundsson responded, "Our plastic wrap has many of the right characteristics for an environmentally friendly shopping bag. It has excellent elastic recovery, requires 25% less material than other plastic wraps, saves machine processing energy, and, unlike other plastic, once biodegradation is complete, all that remains is carbon dioxide, water and inert biomass, all of which are part of the normal bio-cycle." He added, "The company is currently finalizing what changes, if any, would be required to the manufacturing process of its biodegradable film to enter the bag market. Diamant will be poised to include in its array of biodegradable plastic film products an assortment of bag products to support the grocery stores and pharmacies that are looking for shopping bag products that are recyclable or biodegradable and ecologically friendly."

Safe Harbor: This relese may contain "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. "Forward-looking statements" describe future expectations, plans, results, or strategies and are generally preceded by words such as "may", "future", "plan" or "planned", "will" or "should", "expected," "anticipates", "draft", "eventually" or "projected". You are cautioned that such statements are subject to a multitude of risks and uncertainties that could cause future circumstances, events, or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risks that actual results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, and other risks identified in a companies' annual report on Form 6-K or 20F and other filings made by such company with the SEC. Further Diamant Art Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiaries, Diamant Film Inc and Bio-Plastics Film Inc. do not condone or participate in spam activities, e-mail and fax programs of any manner.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Stefan Gudmundsson
Visit website