Select Safety Sales Compiles a FAQ for Eyewash Station Requirements for Workplace Safety and OSHA Compliance

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Select Safety Sales has compiled a FAQ for Eyewash Station Requirements to keep their customers informed of compliance related information. Employers and employees should both be aware of these requirements in order to keep a workplace safe for workers on the job. Not being in compliance could prove to be both a dangerous and costly mistake.

Eyewash Station Requirements

Eyewash Station

“It is in the best interest of everyone involved in workplace safety, including employers and their employees, to stay informed of the safety regulations that will keep them OSHA compliant on the job,” suggests Matthew Kane.

Select Safety Sales has compiled a FAQ on “Emergency Eyewash Requirements” for the industrial workplace. It is a work in progress and as new questions are asked by customers, the FAQ is continuously updated. “These Emergency Eyewash Station Requirements were put together using customer inquiries and due diligence research” says Matthew Kane, a Managing Member of Select Safety Sales. It is a comprehensive research tool that can help an industrial employer stay in compliance with OSHA regulations regarding emergency eye and body wash in order to keep their workforce safe on the job. Frequent questions on both eyewash station compliance and eyewash station emergency aid are asked on a daily basis. “ It is not uncommon to answer the phone and be asked by someone in the industrial workforce how long an injured person needs to flush their eyes if they have been splashed by a harmful chemical or what type of eyewash station is needed for a facility in order to be compliant with OSHA,” states Kane.

Eyewash Stations and Emergency Showers are required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as stated in their regulation 29 CFR 1910.151(c) for first aid. “Where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.” While OSHA states where and when an eyewash station is required, it is the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that develops the standards which specify their use and performance. In 2009, the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) prepared ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2009 which was then approved by ANSI. This standard helps the user ensure that they meet OSHA requirements.

Staying in compliance with these regulations is both beneficial to the health and safety of workers on the job and the financial stability of a company that employs these workers. OSHA issues fines and penalties for businesses that do not comply with their regulations and to businesses where accidents have occurred due to negligence and non-compliance on the part of the employer. These fines and penalties coupled with higher worker compensation premiums, disability payments and possible law suits can be extremely costly for a business. Unsafe workplaces are not where valuable workers want to be employed. “It is in the best interest of everyone involved in workplace safety, including employers and their employees, to stay informed of the safety regulations that will keep them OSHA compliant on the job,” suggests Matthew Kane.

About Select Safety Sales:
Select Safety Sales is a small woman owned business that was founded in 2005. The company’s line of safety products includes Eyewash and Emergency Showers, Portable Hand Wash Stations, Personal Protective Equipment, Fire Safety Products and First Aid Supplies.

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Matthew Kane
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