Fosamax Lawsuit Update: Merck Allegedly Hid Risks of Fosamax, Parker Waichman LLP Recounts

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There are over 3,000 lawsuits alleging that Merck’s osteoporosis drug Fosamax (alendronate) causes bone fractures. The first lawsuit alleging such injuries went to trial this week in New Jersey state court; according to Bloomberg, attorneys for Plaintiff Christina Su allege that Merck knew Fosamax could weaken bones and hid this risk from regulators.

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“Fosamax is a drug that is supposed to help fight bone loss, yet thousands of people are alleging that they suffered from a thigh bone break after taking it,” said Matthew J. McCauley, Senior Litigation Counsel at Parker Waichman LLP.

Parker Waichman LLP, a national law firm dedicated to protecting the rights of victims injured by defective drugs, is recounting the most recent developments in the Fosamax trial currently underway in New Jersey state court. According to Bloomberg report published on March 12, 2013, attorneys for the Plaintiff told jurors that Merck hid the risks of Fosamax, which can allegedly weaken bones and cause fractures rather than prevent them. The company faces over 3,300 lawsuits alleging bone breaks from the osteoporosis drug. The case is Su v. Merck & Co., ATL-L-0789-11-MT, Superior Court of New Jersey (Atlantic City).

“Fosamax is a drug that is supposed to help fight bone loss, yet thousands of people are alleging that they suffered from a thigh bone break after taking it,” said Matthew J. McCauley, Senior Litigation Counsel at Parker Waichman LLP. “These lawsuits, along with supporting research, suggest that Fosamax is defective and actually creates a risk of injury.” Parker Waichman LLP represents several hundred clients in filed lawsuits concerning Fosamax. The firm offers free legal advice for patients who suffered femur fractures or jaw injuries after taking the drug.

According to Bloomberg, the Plaintiff in the trial is Christina Su, a 67-year old retired computer-systems analyst. Su started taking Fosamax in June 2003 and suffered a right femur break in 2009, allegedly due to the drug; later on, doctors inserted a metal rod in her left leg to deal with stress fractures, Bloomberg reports. Su’s attorneys told jurors that Merck knew about the bone-weakening risks of Fosamax for 15 years but failed to act upon this information. They cited a 2006 email from a Merck official in Singapore, which warned that patients who took the drug were experiencing “brittle bones.” Attorneys for Su went on to say that Merck ignored the warning until 2008 when it came off patent.

Fosamax and other bisphosphonate drugs are approved to fight bone loss from conditions such as osteoporosis. However, the drug has come under fire due to reports that it is linked to an increased risk of femur fractures. In June, the Archives of Internal Medicine published a study comparing the atypical versus “classic” fractures. The researchers found a significant relationship between bisphosphonate use and atypical femur fractures, reporting that 82 percent of the patients in the atypical fracture group had taken bisphosphonates.

In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated the safety information on Fosamax to warn about the risk of atypical femur fractures. The agency has also published a review in The New England Journal of Medicine suggesting that there is little benefit of taking bisphosphonates for longer than five years. The findings were based on trials involving 2,342 postmenopausal women.

Parker Waichman LLP continues to offer free legal consultations to victims of Fosamax side effects. If you or a loved experienced an atypical femur fracture and you believe Fosamax is to blame, please contact their office by visiting the firm’s Fosamax website. Free case evaluations are also available by calling 1 800 LAW INFO (1-800-529-4636).

Contact:
Parker Waichman LLP
Gary Falkowitz, Managing Attorney
(800) LAW-INFO
(800) 529-4636
http://www.yourlawyer.com

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Gary Falkowitz
Parker Waichman LLP
1-800-529-4636
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