Noel-Levitz Releases National Freshman Attitudes Report: Study Highlights Noncognitive Indicators of College Readiness Among Freshmen

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Noel-Levitz has released its annual National Freshman Attitudes Report, providing data on dozens of noncognitive student attitudes and concerns in the areas of study habits, academic confidence, career closure, financial security, and more.

Freshman Attitudes report cover

Freshman Attitudes report released by Noel-Levitz

When students share the issues that are on their minds, we gain insights that show us how to make a noticeable, positive difference in their welfare and success.

Noel-Levitz has released its annual National Freshman Attitudes Report, providing data on dozens of noncognitive student attitudes and concerns in the areas of study habits, academic confidence, career closure, financial security, and more. The report also includes findings related to student receptivity toward campus services. The study is based on responses from 103,756 first-year students who began college in 2012.

Among the highlights:

  •     Nearly 30 percent of first-year students reported they "usually get bored and quit after a few minutes" when they try to study;
  •     Only 59 percent of freshmen reported that they have developed a solid system of self-discipline for keeping up with schoolwork;
  •     Forty-five percent of the freshmen respondents agreed with the statement, "Math has always been a challenge for me";
  •     Only 42 percent of first-generation freshmen indicated, "I have a very good grasp of the scientific ideas I've studied in school";
  •     Nearly one-quarter of first-year male students wondered if a college education "is really worth all the time, money, and effort";
  •     Three-quarters of freshmen ages 25 and older reported being settled on their career direction vs. less than two-thirds of traditional-age freshmen; and
  •     Approximately 40 percent of first-generation freshmen indicated they had "very distracting and troublesome" financial problems—a proportion that has generally held steady over the last six years.

The study also looked at students' openness to receiving assistance. For example:

  •     Nearly 60 percent of incoming freshmen expressed a desire to receive help with improving their study habits; and
  •     Nearly half of incoming freshmen indicated they were receptive to help with improving their math skills.

"These findings speak to the value of using noncognitive data to help more students complete their coursework and make progress toward their academic, career, and personal goals," notes Dr. Beth Richter, associate vice president of retention solutions for Noel-Levitz. "When students share the issues that are on their minds, we gain insights that show us how to make a noticeable, positive difference in their welfare and success."

The Noel-Levitz study, titled 2013 National Freshman Attitudes Report, includes suggestions for translating the findings into action. For a copy of this 20-page report, visit http://www.noellevitz.com/FreshmanReport.

About Noel-Levitz
Noel-Levitz is a recognized leader in higher education consulting and research. For 40 years, they have partnered with more than 2,800 campuses to optimize enrollment management and student success through experienced consultation, advanced analytic tools, and campus assessments.

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