FuneralFinancials.com Releases Last Wishes Must-Do List

Following reports of a new study that revealed only a small percentage of people document their preferences on end-of life care near death, Funeral Financials released their must-do list regarding planning for death and funeral decisions.

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If a living will isn’t valid in your state, you should make sure something else is in place to handle things upon your death

New York, NY (PRWEB) May 25, 2013

On May 20, 2013 the Sydney Morning Herald reported that many people do not wish to discuss or plan for their eventual demise, but it is an important responsibility in life. FuneralFinancials.com released a Must-Do List to help people properly arrange for their last wishes.

1. Funeral Financials recommends, “Creating a personal fact sheet.”

While not a formal document, this document can be used to organize financial information and personal data. It may include a summary of assets, debts, obtained burial plots, people to inform about the funeral, safety deposit box details, insurance policies, and other information that can help family members close accounts, access benefits, and contact the correct people. One may also wish to include a paragraph that details any particular wishes for the funeral which can help the family plan for the most appropriate service.

2. Funeral Financials recommends, “ Completing a simple will. “

The foundation of preparation in end-of-life planning is completing a simple will. In it, a person clearly states his intentions regarding property and assets, names the beneficiaries who will receive his property, and declares an executor – the person or entity who will ensure the person’s wishes are properly carried out.

3. Funeral Financials recommends, “Filling out a living will.”

In the fore mentioned article, published by the Sydney Morning Herald, it stated, “A survey of 1000 recently bereaved people found half had discussed end-of-life care with their loved one before they died. And only 15 per cent of those who died had an advance care plan, detailing their preferences on end-of-life care.” A living will is a document related to healthcare that a competent adult fills out to declare his or her intentions regarding life-sustaining procedures. Specifically, the document details whether these procedures be withheld under specific circumstances should the person become unable to communicate their wishes. Funeral Financials’ Senior Editor can be quoted as saying, “Remember, Living wills are not valid in certain states. Consult an attorney to best determine the appropriate document to use. If a living will isn’t valid in your state, you should make sure something else is in place to handle things upon your death.“

The Sydney Morning Herald article showed that death and end-of-life decisions are avoided issues for many people. FuneralFinancials.com released a must-do list to help counsel their readers on effective planning.

About FuneralFinancials.com:
FuneralFinancials.com is a website that counsels people on funeral planning. It is proud to serve as a resource to help their readers navigate the many decisions associated with end-of-life, funeral services and burials.


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