Guardian Angel Service Dogs, Inc. is Winner of New Toyota Highlander

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The 501 (c) (3) nonprofit based in Orange, VA has been named winner of Toyota’s “100 Cars for Good” program

We are honored to have been selected by viewers as one of the Toyota winners; this car is going to make a huge difference in our day-to-day operations and delivery of medical service dogs.

Guardian Angel Service Dogs, Inc., a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization that provides trained medical service dogs to individuals with health issues such as Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes, Hypoglycemic Unawareness and Epilepsy, has been named a winner on the 65th day of Toyota’s “100 Cars for Good” program.

“The amount of support we’ve received for the “100 Cars for Good” competition has been remarkable,” says Dan Warren, founder and President of Guardian Angel Service Dogs, Inc. “We are honored to have been selected by viewers as one of the Toyota winners; this car is going to make a huge difference in our day-to-day operations and delivery of medical service dogs.”

Between May 14th and August 21st, Toyota is giving away 100 cars to nonprofit organizations and philanthropic causes. By logging into Facebook and accessing the 100 Cars for Good app, individuals can publically vote for one of that day’s five contestants to be the winner of a brand new Toyota.

The Toyota Highlander being awarded to Guardian Angel Service Dogs, Inc. will enable the nonprofit to safely transport the medical service dog, trainer and all their equipment and supplies to their new home, thus greatly reducing overall travel costs.

About Guardian Angel Service Dogs
Guardian Angel Service Dogs, Inc. is a fully incorporated 501 (c) (3) organization whose mission is to provide education and raise awareness about the role of service dogs and the different types of assistance they may provide to persons with invisible health issues such as Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes, Seizure Disorders, Hypoglycemic Unawareness, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury and some spectrum disorders such as Aspergers or Autism. It is important for the public to know that people whose lives might be improved or even saved by having a service dog, may have a disability that is not visible. Individuals who struggle with invisible disabilities often will benefit from having a canine companion in their lives to enhance quality of life, provide hope, independence and peace of mind.

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Sarah Dawes
Madison+Main
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