Internet Lawyer Claims Harry Potter Book 7 Leak Shows Copyright Laws Don't Work

With leak of Harry Potter Book 7 Internet lawyer Mike Young suggests new copyright protection is needed for intellectual property rights.

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They're wanting to see what happens to Harry in the final book. As a Harry Potter fan myself, my biggest concern is avoiding the spoilers online until my copy is delivered on Saturday by the post office

Dallas, TX (PRWEB) July 18, 2007

Bootleg copies of author J.K. Rowling's Book 7 in the Harry Potter series have apparently been distributed on the Internet via BitTorrent four days before the worldwide release of the actual print edition of the book to the public. Accordingly to Internet lawyer Mike Young, this copyright infringement is further evidence that existing copyright protections are too old and outdated to protect intellectual property rights. "Look at the how ineffective Hollywood has been in cracking down on piracy despite numerous laws and lawsuits," he said.

Young contends that the publishing industry will join RIAA and the MPAA in calling for stricter punishment for copyright infringement. He claims that this is as useless as Don Quixote chasing windmills. "New laws and draconian penalties won't mean a thing," explained Young. "The Internet has done to copyright laws what the car did to the horse and buggy. It is time for the entertainment industry to readjust their business models to profit with infringement instead of fighting a losing battle against it."

The online piracy happened despite the efforts of Harry Potter publishers to maintain Book 7 under tight security, retailers providing special training for their employees, and requiring some to take vows of secrecy. Unlike the unsubstantiated claims of a hacker in June who posted alleged spoilers from a copy of the book that he never produced, the copies currently floating around the Internet consist of photographs taken of the printed book's actual pages.

If Book 7 follows the pattern of the previous books in the series, bootleg copies will soon appear on all peer-to-peer (P2P) networks and on websites hosted on computer servers in countries that turn a blind eye to piracy of intellectual property.

Despite the piracy, Internet Lawyer Young notes that the print edition of Book 7 should continue to break sales records. According to him, people most likely to read a bootleg copy are already Harry Potter fans. "They're wanting to see what happens to Harry in the final book. As a Harry Potter fan myself, my biggest concern is avoiding the spoilers online until my copy is delivered on Saturday by the post office," Young said.

For more information on how Attorney Mike Young protects entrepreneurs doing business on the Internet, visit http://www.MikeYoungLaw.com

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