Life Line Screening Data on Peripheral Arterial Disease Validated

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Data from Life Line Screening corroborates research recently presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's annual scientific meeting: The importance of the ankle-brachial index in identifying high-risk individuals previously thought to be at low-risk for cardiovascular disease was confirmed.

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We are pleased to see the recent findings presented at the conference reflect our own internal data

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An analysis of almost 1 million Life Line Screening participants confirms the findings recently presented at the Society for Interventional Radiology's annual meeting on the importance of the ankle-brachial index to identify individuals previously thought to be at low risk for cardiovascular disease and correctly categorizing them as possibly high-risk.

The findings presented at the conference came from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of the U.S. population. It looked at 6,292 men and women ages 40 and older with no known history of heart disease, stroke, diabetes or atherosclerotic vascular disease. It found that the use of the Ankle ankle-brachial index, a screening for peripheral arterial disease, has the potential to prevent heart attacks in thousands originally thought to be at low risk.

Life Line Screening's data supports these findings. Analyzing data from almost 900,000 participants from 2007, Life Line Screening found that 474,000 would be considered low-risk based on a traditional Framingham score. Of that "low-risk" group, more than 9,000 scored positive for peripheral arterial disease, indicating the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis.

Similar to those in the NHANES study, Life Line Screening participants are traditionally age 50 and older and are asymptomatic.

"We are pleased to see the recent findings presented at the conference reflect our own internal data," says Chief Medical Officer Andrew Manganaro, MD, FACS, FACC. "We have long suspected that the low risk indicated by a Framingham may conceal the true risk as revealed by other screenings such as the ankle-brachial index. We share the researchers' sentiment that correctly identifying risk is crucial to instituting lifestyle changes and medical management before a serious health event occurs or more costly treatment options are necessary."

About Life Line Screening:
Life Line Screening is the nation's leading provider of community-based preventive health screenings and has a primary focus on stroke prevention and the early detection of subclinical atherosclerosis.

Life Line Screening also provides screening for C-reactive protein, another novel risk factor shown to improve risk prediction by the SIR researchers.

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Joelle Reizes
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