AIDSvideos.org Reaches 2 Million Views for HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Videos Online

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AIDSvideos.org, the leader in video-based HIV/AIDS prevention education, has made 106 original videos in 13 languages and received over two million views for less than $30,000. At just 1.5 cents per prevention education message delivered, AIDSvideos.org has proven that online video and social media can be used for cost-effective HIV/AIDS prevention education in an era of tightened budgets. AIDSvideos.org is now working with partners and volunteers worldwide to translate its videos into 26 languages for online and DVD distribution worldwide.

“AIDSvideos.org has been a wonderful additional resource for the employees of the United Nations system in our program on HIV in the UN workplace." Alan Silverman, Senior Learning Strategy Advisor at UNAIDS

AIDSvideos.org, the leader in video-based HIV/AIDS prevention education, announced today that its videos have now received over two million views, reaching a new milestone in its effort to prevent the spread of HIV.

Alan Silverman, Senior Learning Strategy Advisor at UNAIDS, said that “AIDSvideos.org has been a wonderful additional resource for the employees of the United Nations system in our program on HIV in the UN workplace. The videos – posted on our UN Cares website – help our employees to better understand how to prevent HIV and for those living with HIV, to better understand options for treatment and care. Having a number of the videos in multiple languages is also important for our global network of employees.”

"By leveraging a worldwide network of volunteers, AIDSvideos.org has made 106 original videos in 13 languages and received over 2 million views for less than $30,000, for a cost of less than 1.5 cents per HIV prevention education message delivered," noted Eric Krock, the founder of AIDSvideos.org. "With the lifetime cost of treating one person for HIV now over $600,000, this is likely one of the most cost-effective HIV/AIDS prevention education interventions in the world today."

Studies have shown that video-based HIV/AIDS prevention education messages can be as effective as in-person sessions with a counselor for HIV prevention education and that they can significantly reduce the number of new HIV infections. Studies have also shown that watching online HIV/AIDS educational videos can increase the rate at which men who have sex with men ask their partner's HIV status, disclose their own status, and get tested for HIV, and can increase compliance with antiretroviral medication regimens.

AIDSvideos.org is now working with not-for-profit partners including Global Lifeworks and Sanjeevani Booti and volunteers around the world to translate five videos ("A Brief Introduction to HIV/AIDS," "Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV," "Common Myths About HIV/AIDS," "Did I Just Contract HIV? Symptoms of Primary HIV Infection," and "Top Ten Questions About HIV Tests") into 26 languages. The finished videos will be distributed worldwide both online and on DVDs.

"AIDSvideos.org has already made it possible for us to translate HIV prevention education messages into Hindi and Nepali," said Nandan Upadhyay, the director of Sanjeevani Booti. "We look forward to working with them on further translations."

"Using Internet video has enabled Global Lifeworks to get its HIV/AIDS prevention education message to a far larger audience than we could have with in-person seminars alone," said Becky Kuhn, M.D., the executive director of Global Lifeworks. "Social media has turned into a powerful tool for our mission of building bridges between communities and reaching people worldwide."

AIDSvideos.org HIV/AIDS prevention education videos are syndicated for free online viewing through YouTube and over a dozen other video sharing sites. The videos are also available for free download and reuse from the Internet Archive under the Creative Commons Attribution Required, Non-Commercial, No Derivative Works license. Anyone wishing to support the translation effort can make a tax-deductible donation to Global Lifeworks, which is a registered 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Translators, proofreaders, and video editors can volunteer to help AIDSvideos.org through its web site.

About AIDSvideos.org
AIDSvideos.org is a not-for-profit whose mission is to make all the world's scientifically and medically accurate HIV prevention education videos in all the world's languages available for free. It has released 106 videos in 13 languages to date including English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Mandarin Chinese, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujarati, Swahili, Afrikaans, Japanese, Korean, and Hungarian. All of its videos are available for free distribution and reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution Required, Non-Commercial, No Derivative Works license. AIDSvideos.org is currently working to translate five videos into 26 of the world's major languages including new videos in Cantonese, Vietnamese, Thai, Farsi, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Arabic, Turkish, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Greek, German, Zulu, Xhosa, Swahili, and Amharic. Anyone wishing to support this effort can make a tax-deductible donation to Global Lifeworks. Learn more at http://www.AIDSvideos.org/.

About Global Lifeworks
Global Lifeworks is a registered 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization that strives to stop the spread of HIV in our local communities through education and partnerships that focus both on HIV positive individuals and those at risk. It accomplishes this vision through prevention education, interactive forums, and partnering with other organizations dedicated to serving the medical and psychosocial needs of the HIV/AIDS community and those at risk, offering seminars that examine belief systems and assumptions about who is infected by HIV and how they are treated in society. It builds relationships and bridges between diverse communities to find new and unified ways of caring for those infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. Learn more at http://www.GlobalLifeworks.org/.

About Sanjeevani Booti
Sanjeevani Booti is a registered non-governmental organization in India which exists to provide information about blood-borne diseases to people in North India, particularly around the organization’s base in the city of Varanasi (Benares). It focuses on diseases which have a social stigma against them, such as those which are transmitted by sex or by using syringes. In addition to providing information, it also does community outreach, hosts counseling services, and creates learning and teaching tools. Learn more at http://www.booti.org/.

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