Raw Summer Wildflower Honey at The Naturalist’s Notebook, Seal Harbor, Maine

Share Article

Mohawk Valley Trading Company Raw Summer Wildflower Honey is now available at the The Naturalist’s Notebook, Seal Harbor, Hancock County, Maine, United States. Wildflower honey, also known as polyfloral honey, is derived from the nectar of numerous species of flowers or blossoms and the taste, aroma and flavor will vary from season to season, depending on which flowers are dominant at the time the nectar is collected.

Naturalist's Notebook Logo

Naturalist's Notebook Logo

The taste, aroma and flavor of wildflower honey will vary from season to season, depending on which flowers are dominant at the time the nectar is collected. Mary Ross, The Mohawk Valley Trading Company

Mohawk Valley Trading Company Raw Summer Wildflower Honey is now available at the Naturalist’s Notebook, located in Seal Harbor, Maine.

"Wildflower honey, also known as polyfloral honey, is derived from the nectar of numerous species of flowers or blossoms," said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where they specialize in raw varietal honey. Varietal honey is made primarily from the nectar of a particular type of blossom or flower. To capture the unique character and flavor of the blossom or flower, beekeepers must study botanical bloom and flowering patterns when planning hive placement.

"The taste, aroma and flavor will vary from season to season, depending on which flowers are dominant at the time the nectar is collected," Ross continued "From about April thru mid-late August, we place on both slopes and the surrounding area of the Southern Kuyahoora Valley & Central Mohawk Valley regions of Upstate New York."

About The Naturalist’s Notebook

The Naturalist’s Notebook is a unique shop and exploratorium in the coastal village of Seal Harbor, Maine. It is located a few hundred yards from both the Atlantic Ocean and Acadia National Park. The Notebook combines nature, art and science in fun and inventive ways. Created by artist and photographer Pamelia Markwood and her husband, Craig Neff, a longtime writer and editor for Sports Illustrated, the Notebook is a place where you can feed your brain, shop for everything from great books to stone-ground chocolate to nature-inspired rugs, explore the Earth and the stars, discover Natural League sports, stock up on bird-friendly coffee, study bones and fossils, fly inside a beehive, try to solve puzzles, meet fascinating people, size yourself up against a Neanderthal…or just relax and draw wildlife doodles on the beautiful Natural History Deck. As one newspaper feature described it, the Notebook “somehow [contains] the universe in one two-story building.”

About Honey

Honey has been used by humans since ancient times for its health benefits and as a sweetener and flavoring for many foods and beverages with tea being the most popular. Next to maple syrup, it is the most popular natural sweetener in North America.

Honey bees make honey by collecting nectar from flowers and regurgitating it into beeswax honeycombs inside their hive. Beeswax is a natural wax produced in the hive of honey bees of the genus Apis and one of its most popular uses is beeswax candles and as an ingredient in natural skin care products.

The flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from. Therefore, when cooking or baking with honey it is a good idea to taste the honey before using it in a recipe. For example, a dark honey like tulip poplar-black locust honey will result in a strong, heavy, a pungent flavor, whereas orange blossom honey will result in a delicate orange flavor. Dark colored honey is considered to be higher in minerals and antioxidants than light colored honey and one of the most well-known dark colored honeys is buckwheat honey. Raw buckwheat honey contains a higher amount of minerals and an antioxidant called polyphenol, which gives it its dark color. The health benefits of buckwheat honey are many and well known.

If you are planning to buy honey for its health-benefits, it must be raw honey. Heating honey (pasteurization) destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and aromatics. Honey that has been heated and filtered is called commercial, regular or liquid honey. The rawest honey available is comb honey which is sections of the hexagonal-shaped beeswax cells of the honeycomb that contain raw honey that have been cut from the wooden frames of a beehive.

Using raw honey is a long-term investment strategy for optimal health and personal care; the dividends are overall mental, physical and spiritual well being. Like a blue chip stock, raw honey should be included in any health conscious consumer’s immune system boosting portfolio and the return on investment of substituting honey for refined sugar in the human diet is incalculable.

Pure honey is kosher since kosher honey must be 100% honey with no additives or dilutions and to get the best price when buying large quantities of honey, look for a company that sells bulk or wholesale honey.

Organic honey from the United States is a myth because the country is too developed and uses too many agricultural and industrial chemicals to for the production of organic honey. Honey bees are free-roaming, wild creatures and it is impossible guarantee that while foraging they have not come in contact with prohibited substances, like pesticides.

Another product made by honey bees and used by humans is bee propolis. Propolis is a resinous substance that honey bees collect from tree buds and bark or other botanical sources and mixed with beeswax, nectar and pollen. This mixture is used by bees to seal gaps in the hive and by humans for its health benefits and as a traditional, natural or homeopathic medicine.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Mary Ross

The Naturalist's Notebook
Visit website