Goldenrod Honey 2012 - Mohawk Valley Trading Company is now Available

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The Mohawk Valley Trading Company would like to announce that their regular 2012 Goldenrod Honey is now available in 1lb glass jars for $10.00 each. The Mohawk Valley Trading Company (MVTC) offers the highest quality honey and maple syrup they can produce.

Goldenrod Honey - Mohawk Valley Trading Company

Goldenrod Honey - Mohawk Valley Trading Company

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company would like to announce that their regular 2012 Goldenrod Honey is now available in 1lb glass jars for $10.00 each.

Goldenrod honey can be dark and strong due to the presence of other nectars. However, when Goldenrod is the major nectar source and weather conditions permit the bees to collect the nectar in great quantities; a golden, spicy, mildly pungent tasting honey is the result as it is here.

Raw goldenrod honey or wildflower honey is often used by pollen allergy sufferers to lessen their sensitivity to pollen by eating 1 to 2 tsp. of it each day. The idea is, that by introducing small amounts of pollen into their system by eating raw honey, a tolerance to pollen allergens is built up.

This is not Mohawk Valley Trading Company raw honey.

If you are planning to buy honey for its health-benefits, it must be raw honey. Heating honey (pasteurization) destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and aromatics. Honey that has been heated and filtered is called commercial, regular or liquid honey.

The reason some honey is heated is that the majority of Americans prefer the convenience of being able to spoon, pour or squeeze honey from a bottle onto their cereal or into their tea.

In addition, commercial honey is clearer, easier to measure or spread than raw honey and many people think that honey that has crystallized is spoiled so they discard it. Honey that has been heated and filtered will not crystallize as fast as raw honey.

Although the Mohawk Valley Trading Company specializes in raw honey, they also offer liquid honey for those who prefer it.

Their raw honey is not heated, filtered, blended or processed. All of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals and aromatics are in the same condition as they were in the hive.

About Goldenrod

About Honey

Honey has been used by humans since ancient times for its health benefits and as a sweetener and flavoring for many foods and beverages. The flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from. Dark colored honey is considered to be higher in minerals and antioxidants than light colored honey and one of the most well known dark colored honeys is buckwheat honey. Raw buckwheat honey contains a higher amount of minerals and an antioxidant called polyphenol, which gives it its dark color.

Honey is a healthy alternative to refined sugar, however when cooking or baking with honey, it is not necessary to use raw honey since the heat destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and aromatics. Since the flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from, it is a good idea to taste the honey before using it in a recipe. For example; a dark honey like buckwheat honey will result in a strong, heavy, a pungent flavor, whereas orange blossom honey will result in a delicate orange flavor.

When substituting honey for sugar in a recipe, use about ¾ cup honey in place of 1 cup sugar, and reduce the any liquid ingredients by about 2 tablespoons. Honey is acidic so unless the recipe includes sour cream or buttermilk, add a pinch of baking soda to neutralize the acidity. Baked goods made with honey will brown more quickly so when substituting honey for sugar in a recipe reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees. Honey is hygroscopic meaning it attracts water to itself; therefore baked goods made with honey will absorb moisture from the air and become soft over time.

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Linda Thompson
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