Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Resistance and Aerobic Training Can Improve Memory and Prevent Dementia in Aging Adults

Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study finding that a combination of resistance and aerobic training can effectively improve memory and hold off dementia in aging adults.

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Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Resistance and Aerobic Training Can Improve Memory and Prevent Dementia in Aging Adults

One More Habit to Boost Your Memory.

(PRWEB) May 05, 2013

Doctors Health Press, a division of Lombardi Publishing Corporation and publisher of various natural health newsletters, books, and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, is reporting on a new study finding that a combination of resistance and aerobic training can effectively improve memory and hold off dementia in aging adults.

As Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin (http://www.doctorshealthpress.com) notes, there are some significant studies showing substantial benefits linking exercise and improved cognitive function. Each reveals a clear conclusion: activity improves memory, while sedentary lifestyles degrade it. However, one more recent study, conducted at the University of British Columbia (UBC), focused on the benefits of exercise for memory in older adults.

As the e-newsletter article “One More Habit to Boost Your Memory” reports, the study focused on elderly women between 70 and 80 years old with mild cognitive impairment. After a trial period, the results found that a weight-training regimen improves memory. Participants were better at recalling things in a contextual way, like the names of people and where they met them. Following the study, UBC decided to compare the effects of weight training, aerobic training, and stretching/toning.

The Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin article states that the women were divided into three groups to participate in a six-month observation trial. At the end of the study, women who were in the stretching and toning group performed worse on the memory tests they had taken six months prior. On the other hand, women in the weight-training and aerobics groups showed significant improvement, displaying different strengths in verbal and spatial memory tests, which indicated that weight training and aerobic exercise each offer specific cognitive health benefits.

The article concludes by noting that, along with the obvious physical benefits of a balanced approach to exercise, there is now evidence to suggest that exercise can improve the degenerative mental effects of aging. Adding a few exercise sessions per week, of both weight training and aerobic exercise, can help older adults fight off dementia as they age.

(SOURCE: Nagamatsu, L.S., et al., “Physical Activity Improves Verbal and Spatial Memory in Older Adults With Probable Mild Cognitive Impairment: A 6-Month Randomized Controlled Trial,” J. Aging Res., 2013; doi: 10.1155/2013/861893.)

Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin is a daily e-letter providing natural health news with a focus on natural healing through foods, herbs, and other breakthrough health alternative treatments. For more information on Doctors Health Press, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com.

Doctors Health Press believes in the healing properties of various alternative remedies, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. To see a video outlining the Doctors Health Press’ views on Traditional Chinese Medicine, visit http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/chinesemedicine.


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