Investing in Wine – Collectable Rather than Investment Product

iNVEZZ, a new portal for investors, recently released an analysis on investing in wine following the recent trend for companies offering fine wines as an investment product. While not completely discounting the concept the analysis concludes that other than for those with a strong personal interest and knowledge of the market wine is probably best avoided as an investment product.

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Several incidences of investors who have been scammed by companies offering investment in fine wines are served as a reminder for extra care and vigilance when approached with this kind of ‘investment’.

London, UK (PRWEB UK) 18 October 2012

Frank Quin of Investors’ portal iNVEZZ has taken a closer look at the increasingly popular trend of investing in wine, examining the legitimacy of fine wine as an investable asset. With the number of companies now targeting investors with charts and figures detailing the steady rise of fine wines’ value, an exchange where fine wines can be traded online and increasing media attention, iNVEZZ felt it pertinent to take an objective look at the facts around investing in wine in the likelihood that many of the portal’s readers are likely to have been approached with the prospect of investing in wine.

Quin first warns that an unfortunate side-effect of investing in wine’s newfound media popularity is that unscrupulous firms appear and jump on the band wagon hard-selling and often cold-calling potential investors. Several incidences of investors who have been scammed by companies offering investment in fine wines are served as a reminder for extra care and vigilance when approached with this kind of ‘investment’.

The analysis does however also cover the rise of online wine exchanges that are providing a greater degree of transparency and liquidity to the market and mention a couple of established and reputable companies.

Quin concludes that anyone who is considering investing in wine should keep in mind that at the end of the day the vast majority of wine has a limited shelf life and is essentially made for drinking and not as an investment commodity. There is no fixed market price for certain wines and although of course fine wines can be resold for a profit it is a market that requires specialist knowledge and should essentially be considered as a collectable rather than an investment and best the reserve of those with a strong interest in wine.

To learn more about iNVEZZ, join, contribute your own professional or amateur expertise on the investment areas of your interest or engage with other investors or experts, please visit http://www.iNVEZZ.com.


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