In Recessionary TImes iPhone Boot Camp Startsup as the Industry Booms Selling iPhone Apps for Less Than a Cup of Coffee

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iPhone Boot Camp offers Intensive Three Day Workshop for iPhone developers, January 16-18th in New York.

Iphone Boot Camp NYC

The ultimate goal is to create a pool of talent to draw upon to create a company/community to develop apps together and fill the growing demand

Despite a deepening recession, the only industry nowadays that seems recession proof are sales of Apple iPhones and Apps in the Apple Store.

The most recent figures put the number of iPhones worldwide at 45 million and increasing exponentially. With the introduction of the iPhone in Russia and now China this number could double by the end of 2009. And with the iPhones come the iPhone apps, small downloadable software programs offered for free to as much as ten dollars, with most selling for less than a cup of coffee, highly affordable even in a depression, no less a recession.

To keep pace with the growing demand, iPhone developers are turning out Apps in record numbers since July when the app Store opened its virtual doors worldwide for business. So far there are over 10,000 apps and some developers are becoming very rich, very quickly. Working on his own on weekends and in his spare time Steve Demeter, developer of the vastly popular $5 iPhone game Trism, made $250,000 in profit in just two months If his profits continue at this rate Demeter will earn nearly $2 million by July 2009.

With such a market flourishing and a shortage of developers that understand how to develop for the iPhone, companies are paying a premium to hire skilled developers. Recruiters report salaries from $125-250 an hour are now the norm.

To fill the need both for iPhone Apps Stanford University now offer a semester of academic classes in iPhone development. In New York a group of iPhone developers led by founder Jonathan Sarno started up the iPhone Boot Camp with iPhone guru Alex Cone, CEO of codefab and VP, engineering at medialets, as lead instructor. Cone is a recognized expert in the tools and technologies used in iPhone development since it's inception back when it was called Nextstep.

The iPhone Boot Camp is a three day intensive workshop featuring not only instruction but also networking opportunities to meet with top iPhone development companies and recruiters. The instruction covers most of the features of iPhone development, from the basics to creating the elegant animations in the most popular iPhone games.

Sarno says of the iPhone Boot Camp "I think that something as complicated as iPhone development can't be taught in a lecture hall. It's more for small workshops of no more than fifteen students and the classes fill up fairly quickly. The workshop is very hands-on, with the instructors going step by step through the coding and then exercises and the students working in teams of two or three," he explained. "It's an intensive workshop: a full eight hours of instructions each day with a break for lunch ordered in. It's a hackathons like experience at times, with the creation of dozens of apps, fueled by a steady supply of highly caffeinated coffee and Red Bull and the training "

Sarno is excited about New York iPhone Boot Camp's potential. "The ultimate goal is to create a pool of talent to draw upon to create a company/community to develop apps together and fill the growing demand," Sarno said. "I consider the workshops as part of a greater conservatory around the web to nurture iPhone development talent in both design and engineering."

An IPhone Boot Camps tour is planned in the upcoming months in Austin, San Francisco, San Diego and Boston and a series of training DVD and webinnars are in pre-production based on the course material in the workshops.

The next iPhone Boot Camp is January 16-18, 2009 in New York City. Early bird discounts are still available at $1,499 and discounts for a limited number of students at $1,299

To register: http://iphonebootcamp3day.eventbrite.com/

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Jonathan Sarno
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