Back Pain Specialist, Dr. Christopher Webb, Makes the Journey to Kona, Hawaii to Treat Athletes in the 2010 Ironman Championship

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37-year-old Chris McCormack captured his second Ironman title, completing the grueling spectacle in 8:10:37. This was McCormick's second Ironman title in the last 4 years. The medical staff at the Ironman plays an important role in helping to prepare these athletes for the ultimate test in human endurance. Dr. Christopher Webb of Dr. Webb and Associates made the journey from Pittsburgh, PA to assist the athletes and help to keep them in the competition.

Dr. Christopher Webb pictured with Chris McCormack "Macca"

"These athletes out here are undertaking the most ultimate endeavor a person can pursue. Even with the great strain that is placed on their minds and bodies they have the most positive attitude that I have ever been around in my life." said Dr. Webb.

37-year-old Chris McCormack captured his second Ironman title, completing the grueling spectacle in 8:10:37. This was McCormick second Ironman title in the last 4 years. McCormack, who had trouble with the grueling conditions back in 02' and 03', overcame adversity and rough conditions to successfully prevail.

"The day is always ridiculously tough," said McCormack at his press conference. "It is important to do the little things right. Last year we went back, me and my team, and looked at what we needed to change." McCormack and his team decided to race less this year prior to the competition. In July, McCormack went on to compete in the Frankfurter Sparkasse European Championship. In that race McCormack could not keep up with Andreas Raelert who beat the entire field by a full five minutes. "Andreas made us all look stupid in Frankfurt this year," said McCormack. McCormack would have his day in Kona, when he went on to beat Andreas and the rest of his competition to the finish line.

McCormack was also able to outrun two time defending champion Craig Alexander to win. Alexander credited some gutsy moves by McCormack to help him take the race. The first move came in the bike portion of the race when he pushed the pace with some of the strongest cyclist in the entire world. The move allowed him to clear Raelert and give himself a two minute lead off the bike over Raelert and a nine minute lead over Alexander. All three of these men would get off to a quick start in the initial stage of the marathon flying through the opening miles with sub-six minute times. In the second half of the marathon Raelert and McCormack showed there athletic ability and determination as they pulled ahead and would eventually find themselves stride for stride.

"I had 1:20 at 15 miles," said McCormack at the press conference. "I focused on nutrition and knew that he would need to work hard to catch me. When he caught me with four miles to go, I was feeling very good. We shook hands and I said 'No matter what happens you're a champion' and we didn't say another word to each other."

This grueling display of guts and determination really can take a toll on an athlete's body. The demands that this sport places on the human body can stress even the most physically fit athletes in the world.

"I was getting some stomach cramps at the end," McCormack said. "Your body starts rebelling. I was sticking my hands tight up my rib cage." The staff at the Ironman plays an important role in helping to prepare these athletes for the ultimate test in human endurance. Over 20 doctors were on hand to provide assistance to these athletes. All of the doctors that participated had to be certified in the Active Release Technique (ART), a soft tissue system/movement-based massage technique developed and patented by P. Michael Leahy, DC, CCSP. It is used to treat problems with muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and nerves.

One of the doctors treating the athletes in the event was Dr. Christopher Webb DC, DABCO of Dr. Webb and Associates. Dr. Webb made the journey all the way from Washington, Pennsylvania where his practice is located. Dr. Webb received his certification in Active Release Technique (ART) over two years ago and this was his first time working the Ironman competition.

"These athletes out here are undertaking the most ultimate endeavor a person can pursue. Even with the great strain that is placed on their minds and bodies they have the most positive attitude that I have ever been around in my life," said Dr. Webb.

Dr. Webb's practice has been providing back pain solutions since 1933. Since taking over the practice in 1999, Dr. Webb has not only helped patients with back and neck problems, but has also helped athletes train for marathons and has assisted athletes in preparing their bodies for such an enormous undertaking as the Ironman. Athletes competing in such events can experience strains, tears, and muscle fatigue, all of which are areas in which Dr.Webb possesses valuable experise. Dr. Webb's cutting edge techniques have made him one of the most respected Chiropractors in his field and patients not only come from the Pittsburgh metro area, but travel from many miles away seeking his chiropractic treatments and advice. For more information on Active Release Technique (ART), the Ironman competition, or Dr. Webb and Associates services, please contact Dr. Webb at 724-225-2225 or visit his website at http://www.chirowebb.com/.

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