Holy Grail of Mathematics Pursued in New Groundbreaking Research

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Mathematician Jan Feliksiak publishes his research results on controversial hypothesis in: “The Symphony of Primes, Distribution of Primes and Riemann’s Hypothesis”.

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The Riemann’s Hypothesis - It has become the Holy Grail of Mathematics. Of great mystery and controversy, it has been mentioned in Ron Howard’s film “A Beautiful Mind,” in a Season 1 episode of the television crime drama “NUMB3RS,” and a novel, titled “Life After Genius.” Mathematician Jan Feliksiak labors to bring the focus back to the more serious, disciplined and scholarly attempt to contribute to this quest with his newly published book, titled The Symphony of Primes, Distribution of Primes and Riemann’s Hypothesis.

“In November 1859 Bernhard Riemann presented his memoir “On the number of primes under a given magnitude” in which he made a conjecture regarding the ordered behaviour of zeroes of the Riemann’s zeta function. This conjecture later became known as the Riemann’s Hypothesis,” Feliksiak writes. “The quest to prove R-H began and with time it became the Holy Grail of Mathematics.”

This book presents research results concerning the distribution of prime numbers. The first major result discussed is the supremum for the maximal prime gaps. By an implementation of a binomial coefficient the maximal prime gaps supremum bound is proved, simultaneously establishing the infimum for primes in the short interval.

Subsequently, a novel application of the theory of the primorial function establishes the tailored logarithmic integral, which is a superior adaptation of the classical Gauss’ logarithmic integral. The tailored integral due to its radically improved accuracy over the Gauss' logarithmic integral, constitutes the supremum bound of estimation of the prime counting function. It presents the possibility to estimate the prime counting function with unprecedented accuracy.

Although awards have been offered for any mathematical proofs to prove or disprove it, the Riemann Hypothesis continues to evade either one. Feliksiak’s book, The Symphony of Primes, Distribution of Primes and Riemann’s Hypothesis, is yet another great effort to light the way for many others to follow and hopefully soon find the answer to the most famous open problem in mathematics.

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About the Author
Jan Feliksiak graduated from the Monash University Australia, with a degree in Mathematics. From 2002, he has been involved in research in the areas of analytical number theory and differential equations.

The Symphony of Primes, Distribution of Primes and Riemann’s Hypothesis * by Jan Feliksiak
Publication Date: October 2, 2013
Picture Book; AU$59.99; 132 pages; 978-1-4797-6558-4
Picture Book Hardcover; AU$79.99; 132 pages; 978-1-4797-6559-1
Ebook; AU$3.99; 978-1-4797-6560-7

Members of the media who wish to review this book may request a complimentary paperback copy by contacting the publisher at 1-800-455-039. To purchase copies of the book for resale, please fax Xlibris at (02) 8088 6078 or call 1-800-455-039.

Xlibris books can be purchased at Xlibris bookstore. For more information, contact Xlibris at 1-800-455-039 or on the web at http://www.Xlibris.com.au.

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