Study Shows Kidpower's Program Improves Children's Safety Skills Knowledge To Prevent Bullying, Abuse, And Abduction

An independent study shows that children who participated in Kidpower's Everyday Safety Skills Program had "significantly higher safety skills knowledge" after the program and that 31 percent more of the Kidpower students improved their safety skills knowledge over three months, compared with a comparison group of students who did not receive the Kidpower training until after the study was completed. The findings will be presented today at the 2013 Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting in Seattle.

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A new study shows Kidpower's Everyday Safety Skills Program for classrooms is effective in promoting safety knowledge and skills for children.

The Kidpower Everyday Safety Skills Program integrates a number of best practices in child safety prevention and intervention programs, while working within strict demands of local school systems to minimize the out-of-class time.

Seattle, WA (PRWEB) April 18, 2013

An independent study showing that the Kidpower Everyday Safety Skills program improves children's safety skills knowledge by learning and retaining protective skills for setting boundaries, getting help and stranger safety, will be presented today at the 2013 Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting in Seattle; a conference for an expected 6,500 national and international leading child development professionals, policymakers, practitioners, and researchers representing all fields related to child development.

"This is one of those great opportunities to conduct applied research and really learn what a program is doing well and what needs improvement," said Alaina Brenick, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut, study co-author and presenter at the conference. "The Kidpower Everyday Safety Skills Program integrates a number of best practices in child safety prevention and intervention programs, while working within strict demands of local school systems to minimize the out-of-class time."

"The study showed that children who participated in Kidpower's Safety Skills Program had significantly higher safety skills knowledge after the program and that 31 percent more of the Kidpower students improved their safety skills knowledge over three months, compared with a comparison group of students who did not receive the Kidpower training until after the study was completed," said Dr. Brenick.

The presentation, "Promoting Safety Skills in Children: A Quasi-experimental Evaluation of the Kidpower Everyday Safety Skills Program," will be displayed as a poster and discussed at 1:20pm, April 18, by Dr. Brenick. The presentation and a separate manuscript which is currently under review by an academic journal, are co-authored by Brenick; Julie Shattuck, Founder and Principal at Shattuck Applied Research and Evaluations, who designed and conducted the study; Alice Donlan, Post-doctoral Research Associate at the Center for Promise, Tufts University; Eileen L. Zurbriggen, Professor of Psychology, and Shinchieh Duh, Graduate Student in Psychology, at the University of California Santa Cruz.

"We are excited to see this study get presented at the SRCD, which is a premier professional conference in the field of child development," said Irene van der Zande, Kidpower Founder and Executive Director. "We are dedicated to ensuring that our programs are rigorously evaluated and using evidence-based best practices and innovations to protect children and teach them to protect themselves from bullying, abuse, abduction and other violence."

The "Promoting Safety Skills in Children" presentation is available for review at the conference today and afterwards will be posted online on the Kidpower Safety Skills Research & Efficacy webpage.

The presentation provides an overview of the study and related data analysis to support its finding of significant improvement in children's safety skills knowledge directly after Kidpower program participation and increasing over three months: "A further analysis of individual performances revealed that the proportions of children who improved over time differed significantly between the comparison and the treatment groups. Whereas 62 of the 110 children (56%) in the comparison group improved their scores over time, 111 of the 128 children (87%) in the treatment group improved from Time 1 to Time 3, c2 = 27.46, p < .001, fc = .34."

About Kidpower:
Kidpower is a non-profit leader in personal safety and confidence-building skills education, whose programs are highly recommended by experts worldwide for taking a positive, skills-based approach to preventing abuse, kidnapping, bullying and other violence. Kidpower workshops, K-12 safety curriculum, books, videos, and the Kidpower.org free resource library have helped to protect more than 2 million people, including those with special needs, from abuse, bullying and other violence since 1989. Kidpower's founder and executive director, Irene van der Zande, has been featured as a personal safety expert by USA Today, CNN, and The Wall Street Journal. She is the author of The Kidpower Book for Caring Adults, a comprehensive guide for understanding personal safety, self-protection, confidence, and advocacy for young people; Bullying: What adults need to know and do to keep kids safe; and the Kidpower Safety Comic Series, which many schools use in their child abuse and violence prevention training programs.

Media contact: email "media (at) kidpower (dot) org" for more information or to request an interview.

About Alaina Brenick, Ph.D.:
Alaina Brenick received a 5-year social sciences predoctoral traineeship from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health to complete her doctoral studies in Human Development at the University of Maryland (Ph.D. awarded in 2009). Following her doctoral training, she held a Post-Doctoral Fellowship with the Graduate College of Human Behaviour in Social and Economic Change at the Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena, Germany. Dr. Brenick is currently an assistant professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut. Her research interests are social and moral reasoning, exclusion, discrimination, and victimization based on group membership, intergroup relations in areas of immigration and/or high conflict or violence, and the roles of contact, identity, and culture in these phenomena as well as interventions to reduce stereotypes, prejudice, bullying, and victimization. For more information on her research, go to: http://www.familystudies.uconn.edu/contact/faculty/faculty_brenick.html


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