Latino Voters Seek Action on Immigration Reform

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impreMedia, the leading Hispanic news and information company, released today the second half of its current tracking poll on electoral issues and immigration issues. The results are part of six national polls among Latino registered voters conducted by impreMedia and Latino Decisions.

“The Hispanic community has demonstrated support and confidence in President Obama, stated Monica Lozano, CEO of impreMedia. “However they are seeking action on an issue that has been central to their voting decision.”

impreMedia, the leading Hispanic news and information company, released today the second half of its current tracking poll on electoral issues and immigration issues. The results are part of six national polls among Latino registered voters conducted by impreMedia and Latino Decisions.

While President Obama has increased support from Latino voters, up 9% from a survey two months ago, results from the current tracking poll indicate that this same group remains dissatisfied on immigration and lack of action on the issue by his administration.

“The Hispanic community has demonstrated support and confidence in President Obama, stated Monica Lozano, CEO of impreMedia. “However they are seeking action on an issue that has been central to their voting decision. President Obama and Congress need to respond to the concerns of Latino voters by taking action on immigration issues.”

Forty-nine percent of voters said they were certain to vote for Obama in the next election, compared to 43% and 41% in the last two polls respectively. 12% of respondents said they were planning to vote for him but could change their mind.

Political analysts have attributed the increased support as the general reaction to the capture of Osama Bin Laden and renewed talk of immigration reform. However, the results of this survey indicate Latinos are not content with inaction on immigration reform.

Forty-eight percent of respondents stated that they strongly or somewhat approve of the job the President has been doing handling immigration reform, while 38% somewhat or strongly disapprove.

The President received mixed support on being unable to deliver immigration reform, which was a keystone of the 2008 campaign and also his first year in office. 46% said they felt it was understandable given all the issues, while 42% felt that the President should have prioritized the issue.

Respondents were also asked what they thought about President Obama’s recent meetings and call for Republicans and Democrats to pass immigration reform. 51% stated they felt the President was serious about immigration, while 41% stated they felt he was just saying what Hispanics want to hear.

The results also indicated that Latino voters feel by and large that the Republican Party is responsible for blocking immigration reform, with 50% saying reform has not occurred because they blocked it and 55% saying that the Republicans were using the talking point of securing borders first as a way to block reform.

impreMedia and Latino Decisions will be conducting a telephonic press conference on Monday, June 13, 2011 at 10:30AM PST / 1:30pm EST. The press conference will cover the mentioned results, additional information on Latino voters regarding immigration issues, and insights into Latinos perspective about the upcoming 2012 elections. To access the teleconference dial into 1-877-885- 3221 and enter passcode 4980771.

Breakdowns of the findings are included below:

  •     Do you approve/disapprove of the job Barack Obama is doing as President?

o    Strongly Approve: 41% (38% U.S. born/45% foreign born)
o    Somewhat Approve: 27% (25% U.S. born/29% foreign born)
o    Somewhat Disapprove: 9% (11% U.S. born/7% foreign born)
o    Strongly Disapprove: 15% (15% U.S. born/16% foreign born)

  •     Do you approve/disapprove of the job U.S. Congress is doing?

o    Strongly Approve: 5% (7% U.S. born/4% foreign born)
o    Somewhat Approve: 24% (27% U.S. born/20% foreign born)
o    Somewhat Disapprove: 27% (21% U.S. born/34% foreign born)
o    Strongly Disapprove: 35% (36% U.S. born/35% foreign born)

  •     Thinking ahead to the November 2012 Presidential election, would you say you are more likely to vote for Democrat Barack Obama, or for the Republican challenger?

o    Certain to vote for Obama: 49% (46% U.S. born/52% foreign born)
o    Vote for Obama but could change mind: 12% (8% U.S. born/16% foreign born)
o    Undecided but leaning towards Obama: 5% (6% U.S. born/4% foreign born)
o    Undecided: 10% (11% U.S. born/10% foreign born)
o    Undecided but leaning towards Republican: 4% (6% U.S. born/2% foreign born)
o    Vote Republican but could change mind: 8% (11% U.S. born/4% foreign born)
o    Certain to vote Republican: 10% (9% U.S. born/11% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 2% (2% U.S. born/1% foreign born)
o    Refused: 1% (1% U.S. born/1% foreign born)

  •     Combined Presidential vote from Q3 above?

o    Combined vote for Obama: 66% (60% U.S. born/72% foreign born)
o    Undecided: 12% (14% U.S. born/12% foreign born)
o    Combined vote for Republican: 22% (26% U.S. born/16% foreign born)

  •     Would you say the Democratic party is currently doing a good job of reaching out to Hispanics, that they don’t care too much about Hispanics, or they are being hostile towards Hispanics?

o    Good Job: 48% (52% U.S. born/43% foreign born)
o    Don’t care too much: 31% (26% U.S. born/36% foreign born)
o    Being Hostile: 7% (6% U.S. born/6% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 13% (13% U.S. born/14% foreign born)
o    Refused: 2% (3% U.S. born/0% foreign born)

  •     Would you say the Republican party is currently doing a good job of reaching out to Hispanics, that they don’t care too much about Hispanics, or they are being hostile towards Hispanics?

o    Good Job: 12% (13% U.S. born/11% foreign born)
o    Don’t care too much: 49% (50% U.S. born/46% foreign born)
o    Being Hostile: 23% (26% U.S. born/22% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 14% (10% U.S. born/20% foreign born)
o    Refused: 1% (2% U.S. born/1% foreign born)

  •     How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing handling immigration reform?

o    Strongly approve: 14% (17% U.S. born/11% foreign born)
o    Somewhat approve: 34% (29% U.S. born/39% foreign born)
o    Neither approve/disapprove: 5% (5% U.S. born/5% foreign born)
o    Somewhat disapprove: 20% (22% U.S. born/19% foreign born)
o    Strongly disapprove: 18% (17% U.S. born/19% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 7% (10% U.S. born/5% foreign born)
o    Refused: 2% (0% U.S. born/3% foreign born)

  •     During the 2008 election Barack Obama promised to pass immigration reform that provided a pathway to citizenship. In 2009 he said he would pass immigration reform during his first year in office, but immigration reform never passed. Do you think [rotate the following]

o    Understandable given all the issues: 46% (42% U.S. born/49% foreign born)
o    Obama should have prioritized: 42% (44% U.S. born/40% foreign born)
o    Both combination: 1% (0% U.S. born/2% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 11% (12% U.S. born/8% foreign born)
o    Refused: 1% (0% U.S. born/0% foreign born)

  •     During the 2008 election Barack Obama promised to pass immigration reform that provided a pathway to citizenship. In 2009 he said he would pass immigration reform during his first year in office, but immigration reform never passed. Do you think [rotate the following]

o    Obama did not push hard enough: 33% (26% U.S. born/40% foreign born)
o    Republicans blocked it: 50% (54% U.S. born/48% foreign born)
o    Both combination: 8% (10% U.S. born/6% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 8% (9% U.S. born/5% foreign born)
o    Refused: 1% (2% U.S. born/1% foreign born)

  •     Recently, President Obama hosted three meetings on immigration reform with community leaders, outlined a plan for reform, and gave a speech in which he said, It is time for Democrats and Republicans in the Congress to join me in passing immigration reform in the next two years; OR the President is just saying what Hispanics want to hear because the election is approaching.

o    President is serious about immigration: 51% (50% U.S. born/53% foreign born)
o    Just saying what Hispanics want to hear: 41% (42% U.S. born/38% foreign born)
o    Both combination: 3% (3% U.S. born/2% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 6% (4% U.S. born/7% foreign born)
o    Refused: 0% (0% U.S. born/0% foreign born)

  •     When you hear Republicans say that immigration reform must wait until the border is secure, do you think that it is a legitimate concern that needs to be addressed, OR they are using that as an excuse to block action on immigration reform?

o    Legitimate concern: 30% (32% U.S. born/28% foreign born)
o    Using it to block action: 55% (54% U.S. born/56% foreign born)
o    Both combination: 2% (2% U.S. born/2% foreign born)
o    Something else: 2% (1% U.S. born/3% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 10% (10% U.S. born/10% foreign born)
o    Refused: 0% (0% U.S. born/1% foreign born)

  •     Some people have said that there seems to be a lot of anti-immigrant, and even anti-Hispanic statements, policies and attitudes surfacing in the last year; while other people have said this is politics as usual and no such anti-immigrant environment exists today. Do you feel as though an anti-immigrant or anti-Hispanic environment exists today or not?

o    Yes, anti-immigrant environment definitely exists: 60% (63% U.S. born/56% foreign born)
o    Yes, anti-immigrant environment exists somewhat: 16% (15% U.S. born/17% foreign born)
o    No, such environment exists: 18% (17% U.S. born/19% foreign born)
o    Something else: 2% (1% U.S. born/3% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 5% (4% U.S. born/6% foreign born)
o    Refused: 1% (1% U.S. born/2% foreign born)

  •     Thinking ahead to the November 2012 presidential election, how enthusiastic are you about voting in the election next year?

o    Very enthusiastic: 48% (44% U.S. born/52% foreign born)
o    Somewhat enthusiastic: 28% (29% U.S. born/26% foreign born)
o    Not too enthusiastic: 13% (12% U.S. born/13% foreign born)
o    Not enthusiastic at all: 8% (10% U.S. born/5% foreign born)
o    Don’t know: 3% (2% U.S. born/3% foreign born)
o    Refused: 1% (2% U.S. born/0% foreign born)

Each poll in the series of six reflects Latinos views on current issues related to the economy, education, immigration and healthcare. The current poll surveyed views surrounding the current housing market. The poll is conducted with a sample of 500 registered Latino voters.

Methodology
Latino Decisions surveyed 500 registered voters between May 24th and June 4th in 21 states with the largest Hispanic populations, comprising 94% percent of the US Hispanic electorate. Voters were selected randomly from the registered voter lists and households were identified for contact using the Census Bureau Hispanic surname list, and merged with third party data to secure telephone numbers. Results were weighted to account for minor deviations from known population characteristics. The margin of error is +/- 4.38% on the full sample.

Voter registration status and Hispanic identification were verified upon contact with respondents, who confirmed if they are registered to vote and of Hispanic/Latino descent. Census Bureau reports suggest approximately 90% of all Latinos in the U.S. have a Spanish-surname. In identifying citizens registered to vote, the registered voter list is far superior to either a simple RDD or household list of Spanish-surname households because of non-citizenship, low rates of voter registration among Latinos, and well-documented propensity of all survey respondents, regardless of ethnicity, to over-report registration status.

Surveying was conducted by fully bilingual interviewers. Respondents were greeted in both languages, and surveys were conducted in either English or Spanish, at the discretion of the respondent. Up to five callbacks are scheduled for each record. The survey instrument was created by Dr. Matt Barreto and Dr. Gary Segura in consultation with impreMedia and translated into Spanish. The survey was administered under the direction of Pacific Market Research, in Renton, Washington, and performed using a Computer-Assisted-Telephone-Interviewing (CATI) protocols. CATI programming is performed by Pacific Market Research. Average interview length was 11.43 minutes.

About impreMedia
impreMedia is the leading Hispanic news and information company in the U.S. in online and print. impreMedia's multi-platform offerings range from online to video, social media, mobile, audio, newspapers and magazines, including the http://www.impre.com portal. 25.5% of U.S. Hispanic adults use an impreMedia network product. The network is also the nation's largest Hispanic newspaper publisher with newspapers in top U.S. Hispanic markets, reaching 15 markets total that represent 59% of the U.S. Hispanic population. Its leading publications include La Opinión in Los Angeles and El Diario La Prensa in New York. For more information, visit: http://www.impremedia.com.

ImpreMedia portals and publication websites are: http://www.impre.com, http://www.laopinion.com, http://www.eldiariony.com, http://www.hoynyc.com, http://www.laraza.com, http://www.laprensafl.com, http://www.elmensajero.com, http://www.rumbotx.com, http://www.vistamagazine.com, and http://www.contigola.com, http://www.lavibra.com, http://www.impreautos.com.

Press Inquiries for impreMedia
Jacquelynn Carrera
(213) 896-2368
jacquelynn.carrera(at)impremedia(dot)com

About Latino Decisions
Latino Decisions is a joint effort between Pacific Market Research, a nationally known research firm, and Dr. Gary Segura and Dr. Matt Barreto, leading Latino politics scholars and professors at Stanford University and the University of Washington. Both Dr. Segura and Dr. Barreto are experienced and nationally respected researchers who have a deep understanding of U.S. Latino culture and advanced quantitative research skills. Their expertise, coupled with Pacific Market Research’s logistical capabilities, makes Latino Decisions a leader in the field. For more information, please visit http://www.latinodecisions.com or call 877-271-2300.

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