Georgia State Lawmakers Meet University of Georgia Health Promoting Professors

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The University of Georgia played host to the state's lawmakers on January 25th, by hosting a reception in downtown Atlanta where the University showcased three of its premier programs: the Office of the Vice-President of Research, the College of Pharmacy and the new College of Public Health. In order to demonstrate the College's outreach and public service activities, Professor Galen requested a Lifeclinic automated health-testing kiosk for the event. Lawmakers, deans and university faculty mingled while many checked their blood pressure and other biometrics. State Representatives Howard Mosby (District 90) and Al Williams (District 165) showed particular interest in the potential for bringing health monitoring, patient education and disease awareness to patients using the Internet-connected kiosks.

The University of Georgia played host to the state's lawmakers on January 25th, by hosting a reception in downtown Atlanta where the University showcased three of its premier programs: the Office of the Vice-President of Research, the College of Pharmacy and the new College of Public Health. Representing the College of Public Health was its Dean, Phillip L. Williams, and Professor Robert S. Galen, head of the Department of Health Administration, Biostatistics and Epidemiology.

In order to demonstrate the College's outreach and public service activities, Professor Galen requested a Lifeclinic automated health-testing kiosk for the event. Lawmakers, deans and university faculty mingled while many checked their blood pressure and other biometrics. State Representatives Howard Mosby (District 90) and Al Williams (District 165) showed particular interest in the potential for bringing health monitoring, patient education and disease awareness to patients using the Internet-connected kiosks.

The automated health-testing kiosks were designed by University of Georgia researchers with the help of Lifeclinic. The kiosks are state-of-the-art and user-friendly. They offer automated blood pressure, weight, body fat, body mass index and blood oxygen tests, as well as glucose meter upload capability. Additionally, peripheral input ports are available including IR (infrared) and USB for interfacing with various personal health devices like pedometers and personal activity monitors. Patients may easily navigate through the kiosk's interface of test options and health information database via a touch screen. Initially funded by the Georgia Cancer Coalition, Professor Galen's telemedicine program is now partnering with the American Cancer Society to deliver local community cancer resource information to Lifeclinic health testing kiosks throughout the state. The College of Pharmacy, the College of Education and the Grady College of Journalism have joined with the College of Public Health to collaborate on this far-reaching initiative. Professor Galen plans to have 300 Lifeclinic kiosks in place by the end of the year.

University of Georgia President, Michael Adams, has been a long time supporter of the Land Grant's public health efforts. In his recent State of the University Address, he mentioned the new College several times:

"Related to that effort, and one of the new academic developments of which I am most proud, is the creation of the College of Public Health in 2005. I want to offer my congratulations to Dr. Phil Williams on his appointment as the first dean of that college. He and his colleagues have three major responsibilities. First is to serve the people of Georgia by creating avenues through which the entirety of the state's health will be improved. Second, is to become fully accredited in the minimum five-year period while developing another significant source of research funding for the University. And third, is to serve as an anchor in the development of a broadened health research focus and to be a growing segment of a proposed health science campus on the Navy School site."

From the State of the University, Dr. Michael Adams, President, University of Georgia, January 11, 2007

The evening was an overwhelming success, providing lawmakers with a better understanding of just what type of research the University was engaged in and how the people of Georgia might directly benefit from these activities.

At the reception, Professor Galen said, "For years we've understood the Internet's ability to connect us to an extensive array of information and resources. Embracing it at a level that allowed the general population to become proactive in co-managing their own health was, understandably, sometimes met with concern by the medical establishment. However, I truly believe that we're now at a point where doctors, caregivers and the public health sector are more than willing to utilize these various Internet technologies, such as an automated health testing kiosk, not as a replacement for the traditional patient-caregiver relationship, but rather instead as an added benefit and enhancement. Empowering people in the overall discussion about their health and the decisions on what to do next makes for a health-educated and fit society. Telemedicine provides a convenient basis for enhancing communication between the patient and caregiver. In essence, connected is protected!"

About Lifeclinic International, Inc.

Lifeclinic (http://www.lifeclinic.com) was established in 1976 as Vita-Stat Medical Services, Inc. Since then, it has grown to be the world's largest supplier of commercial, automated, health kiosks. Lifeclinic health kiosks can be found in over 27,000 pharmacies and 4,000 company and organizational wellness centers worldwide, accounting for 400 million blood pressure measurements annually. Lifeclinic health kiosk and management systems encourage individuals to take an active role in their health care and provide corporate management with the tools to help reduce costs while simultaneously improving the health of individual employees. Lifeclinic's health kiosk interface of text, audio and visuals are available in 16 different languages, and the systems can be found in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, England, India, Russia, Turkey, the United States and many other countries worldwide.

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