"Idea Stories" were prevalent in recent quarter for the largest speculative fiction contest for new writers in the world

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Entrants are listening to contest organizers and going for their original ideas, rather than after popular themes in L. Ron Hubbard's international Writers of the Future contest

Writers Of The Future

Writers Of The Future

Originality is the most important aspect to a story being selected as a finalist in this contest. You need an imagination and I tell all aspiring writers that I’ll choose the most creative entry every time.

Every quarter the thousands of entries in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest – the world’s largest and oldest science fiction and fantasy contest for new writers – are reviewed to see what the current popular subjects are. The current trend leans towards new ideas, original concepts. Those are categorized as science fiction. There were fewer fantasy stories this quarter but dragons remain the main subject matter entered in that genre.

In making the announcement, Dave Wolverton, Writers of the Future Contest coordinating judge and first reader, said, "Originality is the most important aspect to a story being selected as a finalist in this contest. You need an imagination and I tell all aspiring writers that I’ll choose the most creative entry every time. Of course your basic story telling skills must also be present, but originality of idea is tops on the list. When "Twilight" came out, we saw a slew of vampire stories. This is now dying down and was replaced with superhero type stories for a while. Now, it seems the contestants understand that we are looking for new ideas, not old themes. This is a very encouraging sign.”

Now in its 29th year, the Writers of the Future Contest attracts entries worldwide. Twelve quarterly winners receive prize monies and, along with selected finalists, are published in an annual anthology, L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future (Galaxy Press).

Initiated by multiple New York Times’ best-selling author L. Ron Hubbard, the merit-based Writers of the Future Contest has discovered the careers of 11 New York Times bestselling authors.

Wolverton recommends that prospective writers visit http://www.writersofthefuture.com for more information on how to enter the contest.

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Joni Labaqui
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