Marketing Strategist Shares Five Ways to Help Kids Feel Comfortable Connecting

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Building relationships is one of the most important aspects of being an adult, according to marketing strategist, Maribeth Kuzmeski. In order to get today’s youth to start talking and become more personable, Maribeth is sharing five ways parents can help their kids to engage with others in her book The Engaging Child.

The Engaging Child

Every connection you don’t make is a potential opportunity missed, so engaging meaningfully is a skill that’s best learned early.

Despite the hyper-connections today’s technology affords, many children are at a loss for words when it comes to connecting face-to-face, according to marketing strategist, Maribeth Kuzmeski, author of The Engaging Child: Raising Children to Speak, Write and Have Relationship Skills Beyond Technology. Children have become a targeted demographic among smart-device companies, according to a recent study by MDG Advertising, with seven out of 10 children under 12 years old using tablets such as iPads. In an effort to get today’s youth to start talking and become more personable, Maribeth is sharing five ways parents can help their children to engage with others.

“Small talk is an important skill for any connector, regardless of age, to master,” says marketing strategist Maribeth Kuzmeski. “From the check-out line at the grocery store to the person sitting next to you on a flight, you just never know which connection can result in something big or powerful.”

The Engaging Child gives kids the skills they’ll need to grow into happy, confident and successful adults. In the book, Maribeth Kuzmeski explains how parents can help their kids become true connectors using day-to-day events as opportunities to practice connecting.

To ensure kids feel comfortable connecting with others, Maribeth shares five strategies they can use to connect with people in any scenario:

  •      Share something extra when answering easy-to-answer stock questions.
  •     Be complimentary by commenting on something interesting about a person as a way to break the conversational ice.
  •     Talk about the weather and be aware of surroundings to comment on during small talk.
  •     Find things in common and be aware of conversational and external cues to turn a mediocre conversation into something meaningful.
  •     Wrap it up well with a few rehearsed lines that will end a conversation successfully.

“Every connection you don’t make is a potential opportunity missed, so engaging meaningfully is a skill that’s best learned early,” says Maribeth Kuzmeski.

About the Author:
Maribeth Kuzmeski, MBA, CSP, is the author of 7 books including The Connectors (John Wiley & Sons), and The Engaging Child (on cultivating face-to-face skills for our Tech-kids). She is an international keynote speaker and a regular media contributor. Maribeth has her own foundation supporting youth leadership and education, The Red Zone Leadership Foundation, and is President of Red Zone Marketing, Inc.

About the Book:
The Engaging Child: Raising Children to Speak, Write, and Have Relationship Skills Beyond Technology (Red Zone Publishing, 2012, ISBN: 978-0-9717780-3-0, $18.95) is available at bookstores nationwide and from major online booksellers.

For more information, please visit http://www.theengagingchild.com.

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