Mayan Culture Experts Discuss the Mayan Calendar 2012 End Date at Hotel Xixim, Yucatan, Mexico

Share Article

During a well-attended November 16-18 symposium at Hotel Xixim (http://www.hotelxixim.com), Yucatan, Mexico, three Mayan culture experts discussed the various interpretations of the Mayan calendar end date of December 21, 2012 -- its cultural and historical significance, as well as the scientific meaning. Additionally, to celebrate the birth of a New Mayan Era, Hotel Xixim plans a Mayan ceremonial festival on December 21.

Temple Pyramid of the Dwarf, Uxmal

Temple Pyramid of the Dwarf, Uxmal

There are no records that the Mayans predicted an end of the world.

Much has been discussed world-wide about the Mayan calendar end date 2012, from dooms-day theories to predictions of a “New Era” of peaceful coexistence. The recent symposium, “Mayan Cosmic Gathering” at Hotel Xixim (http://www.hotelxixim.com) on November 16-18, featured three renowned Mayanologist experts who delivered precise information on the Seven Mayan Prophesies found on stone markers with what appears to be the Mayan calendar end date. Using documented anthropological and archaeological knowledge, these experts separated the science from myth.

Although some of the prophecies can be interpreted differently, the three Mayan experts completely agreed that the Mayan calendar end date does not predict the destruction of the planet and the end of the world. Archeologist Tomas Gallareta, noted that the evidence of the end of the Mayan calendar after 13 b’ak’tuns (5,125 years, 133 days) is found on a stone monument split in half at El Tortuguero, a Classic period Mayan site in the southern Mexican state of Tabasco. Dr. Arcadio Poveda Ricalde, astronomer, explained the significance to the Maya of the sun, moon, Venus, Mars and the rising and setting of the constellations Pleiades and Orion. Professor Marte Trejo outlined how Mayan astronomical calculations dictated seasonal cycles for planting. He also stated there are no records that the Mayans predicted an end of the world. The calendar end date simply signifies the end of the 13th b’ak’tun (about 394 years) and the beginning of a new era -- the 14th b’ak’tun.

A recent discovery at Xultun, a Mayan archaeological site in northern Guatemala near its border with southern Mexico, gives further evidence of the beginning of a “New Era”, and not the world’s end. At Xultun, recently discovered Mayan mathematical and astronomical calculations, based on the Mayan calendar, project some 7,000 years into the future from 813 A.D.

Celebration of the New Mayan Era at Hotel Xixim on December 21

To mark the New Mayan Era with the beginning of the 14th b’ak’tun, Hotel Xixim plans a special celebration on December 21. Guests will enjoy Mayan rituals, specially prepared Mayan food, and a dramatic show featuring the “Maya Awakening in a New Era”. Traditional Mayan food such as cochinita pibil (pork loin seasoned with annatto seed, wrapped in banana leaves, and baked underground) and other pre-Hispanic menu items will delight guests. Mayan dancers and a Mayan shamanic blessing around a beach bonfire will highlight the event. Reservations can be made through the hotel’s website.

About Hotel Xixim
Hotel Xixim, a unique Mayan hotel located on the white sand beaches of the western Yucatan Peninsula just one hour west of Merida, welcomes guests in 32 individual Mayan style bungalows with high thatched ceilings, fans, louvered and screened window ventilation, and private outdoor garden showers. The hotel nestles in tropical coastal vegetation inside the Celestun Biosphere Reserve, a nationally protected area known for more than 300 species of birds and sub-tropical wildlife. Because of its architectural style and diligent protection of the natural environment, the hotel resembles a Mayan village. Adhering to strict ecological standards, the hotel offers first class, comfortable accommodations, a restaurant, bars, library and game area, 2 swimming pools, a new Wellness Center, and a seaside SPA. Guests explore nature and experience Mayan culture and archaeology through on-site hotel activities and guided excursions to view flocks of pink flamingos, birds, wildlife, many ancient ruin sites, and former haciendas. Yoga and wellness retreat guests rejuvenate in the hotel’s pristine natural environment. Individuals can book vacation packages on the hotel’s website: http://www.hotelxixim.com. For group information and discounts, contact groups(at)hotelxixim (dot)com.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Patti Kilpatrick
Solsierra Marketing
206-414-1923
Email >
Follow us on
Visit website