Do You Have A Curious Kid? American Mensa Offers Chance To Qualify For Free This February

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Max the Fox from http://www.mensaforkids.org invites your intelligent child to see if they qualify for American Mensa, a place where like-minded kids can attend fun events and participate in community service.

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Gifted children can sometimes feel out of place at school or held back, and American Mensa is an organization where they can meet like-minded individuals and build lasting friendships

Max the Fox from http://www.mensaforkids.org invites your intelligent child to see if they qualify for American Mensa, a place where like-minded kids can attend fun events and participate in community service. American Mensa is an organization for those who score in the top two percent on an accepted, standardized intelligence test. During the month of February, those 17 and under can submit test scores for review to see if they qualify for the organization. Besides local events for families and children, Mensa also has an active TeenSIG, which provides a social sphere for people between the ages of 13 and 19 to interact with each other.

To take advantage of the offer, download the application (http://www.us.mensa.org/application) and return it with prior test scores between Feb. 1-28, 2009. A person interested in Mensa membership may submit a test score from anytime in his or her life; there are no age requirements. Mensa accepts more than 200 tests for membership. A condensed version of that list can be found by visiting http://www.us.mensa.org/scores and clicking on "qualifying scores." After qualifying for membership, the annual dues rate of $59 applies.

Many schools administer IQ tests to children throughout school years, and parents can obtain these scores by having the school photocopy the documentation and sealing the envelope with an official school seal. Examples of tests accepted for review include the Wechsler Intelligence Scale, Otis Lennon School Abilities Test (OLSAT), Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test, Cognitive Abilities Test (CogAT) and Stanford Binet. A parent can submit any accepted IQ test score for their child, no matter the age it was taken.

"Gifted children can sometimes feel out of place at school or held back, and American Mensa is an organization where they can meet like-minded individuals and build lasting friendships," said Pam Donahoo, Executive Director of American Mensa. "By offering free prior test score review, kids and teens can see if they qualify for membership. Once they become members, they have the opportunity to attend national events and participate in the gifted children programs."

American Mensa is an organization open to anyone who scores in the top two percent on an accepted, standardized intelligence test. The organization has more than 56,000 members in the United States and more than 110,000 members around the world. Members of Mensa attend local and national events, join special interest groups such as astronomy and philosophy, and help out in their communities through various projects. Dues are $59 annually. For more information about Mensa, or to apply for membership, visit http://www.us.mensa.org or call (800) 66-MENSA.

*Max the Fox is the mascot of http://www.mensaforkids.org, an award-winning Web site launched by the Mensa Education & Research Foundation. The Mensa for Kids Web site was designed to promote kid-friendly education by providing children with daily intelligence enrichment through games, puzzles, activities and articles.

For more information:
Catherine Barney; 817/607-0060 ext. 5541
Lauren Fernandez: 817/607-0060 ext. 5542

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Catherine Barney

Lauren Fernandez

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