Moodtraining.com Launches a New Website Where Users Learn How to Optimize Mood

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Brain researchers, meditation experts, and fitness professionals team up to launch a new resource. Their new site http://www.moodtraining.com is a community dedicated to optimizing mood through exercise, meditation, and other scientific body/mind principles.

Learning how to train your mood

We know the brain changes in response to life experience. Moodtraining empowers everyone to change their life, and their mood, by changing their experience, and therefore their brain.

Moodtraining.com launches as a site dedicated to optimizing mood through the use of exercise, self-monitoring, meditation, and other neuroscience based body-mind techniques.

The website will serve as a resource for people to learn about body-mind fitness, get free moodtraining workouts and meditations, and share experiences.

Initially developed as a blog by Dr. Matthew Keener at the University of Pittsburgh, the site has grown to encompass input from a team of professionals including researchers at Duke, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania. This team includes positive psychology experts, brain imaging researchers, meditation researchers, and sports trainers. They created the current site after they realized that significant research on the effects of exercise, meditation, and other emotion regulation methods remained inaccessible to lay people.

Moodtraining.com makes cutting-edge mood research easy to understand and act upon so that people can gain awareness and control of their emotions.

Dr. Keener, a brain-imaging research psychiatrist remarked, "We began to notice that there was no one resource for targeted body/mind exercises that we could recommend for our patients and friends. When we looked to the fitness literature, there was usually a ‘one-sized fits all’ approach as it related to emotional wellness. We had the important insight that it's actually very helpful to think about the type of mood someone is experiencing in order to best recommend what kind of exercise or meditation they should do. Somebody currently looking to deal with anger might benefit from a different regimen than one that could target anxiety."

According to Dr. Jeff Greeson at Duke University Medical Center, "We know the brain changes in response to life experience. Moodtraining empowers everyone to change their life, and their mood, by changing their experience, and therefore their brain."

The team emphasizes that although most of the research in mood improvement has been done with people suffering from psychiatric illness, the ability to regulate our mood is something that everyone can better cultivate. Says Dr. June Gruber at Yale University, "Enhancing overall wellness through monitoring your emotional state and using proven modalities like exercise and meditation is something everyone could benefit from. We all need a variety of tools that can help us better cope with the hectic pace of modern life."

Significantly, Moodtraining.com will offer not only expert ideas on their website, Facebook page, and twitter feed, but also engage community feedback, and begin a conversation on the best ways to “train” your mood.

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Carolyn Elliott
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