The Bella Moss Foundation Announces U.S. Tour to Raise Awareness of MRSA in Pets

The Bella Moss Foundation will be presenting three sessions in April to increase awareness in the U.S. about the growing threat of MRSA in pets, as well as ways that the U.S. veterinary industry can increase early detection and prevention.

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The Bella Moss Foundation

MRSA is a clear and emerging problem with pets in North America. Well over 1,000 infections occur each year, and it is likely that a large number of infections go undiagnosed

New York, NY (Vocus) March 24, 2010

The Bella Moss Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in the United Kingdom dedicated to assisting veterinarians and pet owners with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), will be landing in America in April to spread the word about the growing threat of MRSA in pets, as well as ways that the U.S. veterinary industry can increase early detection and prevention.

“MRSA is a clear and emerging problem with pets in North America. Well over 1,000 infections occur each year, and it is likely that a large number of infections go undiagnosed,” said Dr. J Scott Weese, advisor to the Bella Moss Foundation. “The strains of MRSA that cause infections in pets are the same as those that cause disease in people, demonstrating the close relationship between people and their pets, and the impact that people and pets can have on each others’ health.”

Jill Moss, president of the Foundation, and Mark Dosher, co-founder, will be presenting at the American Animal Medical Center, the University of South Florida, and Cornell University. The message: MRSA is preventable and treatable if detected early.

“Our strategy is to raise awareness of MRSA among U.S. pet owners and to improve clinical approaches to MRSA by veterinarians, as we have in the UK,” said Moss. “The U.S. veterinary associations have limited information on MRSA, and we have provided veterinarians in the United States with access to our clinical advisors to help with first-time cases. We hope to aid veterinary associations in the U.S. to make more information widely available for veterinarians.

“Recent research from the Second International Conference on MRSA in Animals in London shows that MRSA and other antibiotic resistant bacteria in animals are on the increase, but they can be prevented by increased hygiene and reduced use of antibiotics," Moss continued. "Fortunately, with early detection, MRSA in pets can be treated successfully.”

The Bella Moss Foundation was founded in 2007 by Moss, whose dog Bella died from MRSA infection after routine cruciate ligament surgery following an injury in 2005. Bella’s death was the first publicly recorded canine death in the UK from MRSA. Thanks to the efforts of the Foundation, the UK now has high levels of awareness of the MRSA risk to animals and clinical approaches have improved significantly.

The Bella Moss Foundation will be presenting on how to prevent the spread of MRSA between humans and animals and promoting best veterinary practice at the following dates and venues:

  • The Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, April 8
  • Cornell University Animal Teaching Hospital, Ithaca, NY, April 10
  • The University of South Florida Infectious Diseases Department, April 12

For more information on the Foundation, its U.S. tour, and clinical abstracts, visit http://www.thebellamossfoundation.com.

About The Bella Moss Foundation

The Bella Moss Foundation (BMF) is a UK Registered charity (1122246) that provides support and information for veterinarians and pet owners regarding MRSA and other serious infections in animals. By raising awareness, BMF has helped hundreds of animals worldwide recover from MRSA infections through early detection and the correct treatment. BMF provides direct input into the MRSA (animals) sub group of the Defra antimicrobial resistance committee and consumer engagement committee on animals’ welfare. It is an associate member of the Parliamentary All Party Group on Animal Welfare and regularly collaborates with veterinary organizations such as the British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Royal Veterinary College (UK), University of Guelph (Canada), and the Ohio University Department of Vet Clinical Sciences (USA). For more information, visit http://www.thebellamossfoundation.com and http://www.veterinarynursetrainingonline.org.

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