CCRCs Offer Opportunities to Build New Relationships and Social Connections with Like-Minded People, According to Senior Living Report Commissioned by Vi

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Spending your retirement years in your current home can result in growing isolation and loneliness, says renowned gerontologist Ken Dychtwald Ph.D. in a new report. Instead, senior living options, like a continuing care retirement community, offer opportunities to create new friendships and social connections. The full report, “Five Myths and Realities of Continuing Care Retirement Communities,” is available in its entirety at Vi Living.

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Residents of CCRCs say that it is the opportunity to meet, learn from, and engage in new activities with positive, stimulating, like-minded people that can make life brighter and fuller.

A new report by renowned gerontologist Ken Dychtwald Ph.D. challenges the popular myth that one’s current home is the best option to continue an active social life and stay connected during post retirement years.

“The reality is that that remaining in your home can result in growing isolation and loneliness in later life,” said Dychtwald, psychologist, gerontologist, best-selling author and CEO of Age Wave. “Senior living options, like a continuing care retirement community (CCRC), offer opportunities to create new friendships and social connections.”

Titled “Five Myths and Realities of Continuing Care Retirement Communities,” Age Wave’s report and supporting research were commissioned by Vi, a developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities. The document is available in its entirety at Vi Living.

According to the report, friendships and close social connections are an essential source of happiness, and people age 60 and over are most likely to cite “living family and friends” as extremely important to their happiness – more important than money or even health.

Yet, the report says, it is not uncommon for people who stay in their current home during post retirement to find that their friends and family move away, and many can feel increasingly lonely or isolated in their current home. Studies show that having low social interaction is as bad for your health as smoking fifteen cigarettes a day, is as dangerous as being an alcoholic, is as harmful as never exercising, and is twice as dangerous as obesity.

According to the report, residents of CCRCs say that it is the opportunity to meet, learn from, and engage in new activities with positive, stimulating, like-minded people that can make life brighter and fuller.

Said one interviewee in the report: “The No. 1 benefit is that you’re surrounded by successful, interesting people. You have a pretty good chance of finding people who may make an impact on your life.”
In addition, the report said, residents often describe the staff as an “extended family,” which, together with visits from family and opportunities to meet family members of other residents, helps to create a dynamic, multigenerational social environment.

CCRCs offer independent living with a combination of a private residence, services, amenities and care (for example, assisted living, memory support care and skilled nursing care).

About Vi
Vi, formerly Classic Residence by Hyatt, was founded in 1987 as a developer, owner and operator of older adult living communities. The company is dedicated to enriching the lives of older adults by providing high quality environments, services and care. Vi currently operates ten continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) and one rental community under a family of brands nationwide. For more information about Vi communities, visit Vi Living.

About Age Wave
Founded in 1986, Age Wave is the nation’s foremost thought leader on population aging and its business, social, healthcare, financial, workforce and cultural implications. Under the leadership of Founder/CEO Dr. Ken Dychtwald, Age Wave has developed a unique understanding of the body, mind, hopes and demands of new generations of maturing consumers and workers and their expectations, attitudes, hopes, and fears regarding retirement.

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Tim Hermeling
Vi
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