Urgent Alert from Narconon: US Drug Users Warned to Avoid 'Krokodil'

Addictive, homemade drug used extensively in Russia creates physical destruction and leads to death faster than any other illicit drug.

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If a person can’t stop using illicit drugs, he is safest if he finds an effective rehabilitation program but no matter what, don’t use krokodil.

(PRWEB) October 01, 2013

'Krokodil' is a new drug on the illicit market, homemade from codeine pills and a variety of household chemicals: iodine, gasoline, paint thinner or alcohol. In Russia, it has been known as a killer drug for several years. But it is suspected of just having made its first appearance in Arizona.

http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-krokodil-heroin-arizona-20130927,0,7644763.story

The chemical name of this drug is desomorphine, an opiate like heroin. In Russia, codeine headache pills are sold over the counter. Drug users buy these pills and then cook up the desomorphine in their kitchens. The resulting drug, many times less expensive than heroin, is then injected. The effects are unlike anything else on the market.

Reports are that krokodil users' flesh simply rots right off their bones. The nerves are dead so there is no feeling in these body parts so a person can have a gangrenous, rotting arm or leg without its manifesting any pain. There is brain damage and teeth and jawbones disintegrate. Livers and kidneys become inflamed and won't heal. Abscesses appear at injection sites. The nickname comes from the fact that some users' skin becomes green and scaly. The life expectancy of a krokodil addict in Russia is reported to be about two years.

"To prevent an epidemic in this country like they have had in Russia, anyone who is using illicit drugs should refuse to touch this one," said Clark Carr, president of Narconon International. "If a person can’t stop using illicit drugs, he is safest if he finds an effective rehabilitation program but no matter what, don’t use krokodil."

Avoiding use of krokodil is far better than having to withdraw and recover from the addiction. Withdrawal from this drug is worse than withdrawal from heroin and is said to last longer.

Even when a person sees his body starting to rot away, the intense cravings drive him to use more of the drug. Even a single use can trigger cravings that entrap a person.

"Anyone who has started to use krokodil should seek help immediately, before there is severe physical damage that can never be undone," said Carr. "But recovery is possible, even from this terrible drug. The best choice is long-term rehabilitation, as recommended by the National Institute on Drug Abuse."

The Narconon drug and alcohol rehabilitation program helps people recover control over their lives. In the US and around the world, there are nearly fifty Narconon rehab locations. For more information on the Narconon program, call 1-800-775-8750.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/principles-effective-treatment


Contact

  • Clark Carr
    Narconon International
    323-962-2404
    Email