The Danger of "Time Spent on Social" as a Qualifier

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Looking to identify your best social media communicator from among your current staff? The amount of time spent on social media may not be the best qualifier, says Nate Long in new article.

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Photo Credit: Goiaba – Johannes Fuchs

Remember that the person you choose from within to handle your social media efforts will represent the public face of your company to many people.

Companies looking to identify their best social media communicator by using amount of time spent on social media as a primary qualifier may be wise to re-think their strategy, says Nate Long in a new article published today on NateLongMarketing.com.

The article, titled "The Danger of "Time Spent on Social" as a Qualifier," is a response to a recent article on Forbes.com titled "Should You Outsource Social Media Or Do It Yourself?" Long mostly agrees with the Forbes article, but warns against one piece of advice the article gives: When choosing a person to lead social efforts, select the person who spends half the work day on Facebook.

"My issue here is that time spent on social media is clearly suggested as the primary qualifier for determining who in the office should run the company’s social media efforts," said Long. "Is this person posting selfies and trolling former high school friends, or is he engaging in useful conversations with your customers and stakeholders? Unfortunately, time spent doesn’t tell us the whole story."

Long says that many businesses make the mistake of choosing the youngest person on staff to manage social media simply because of the misconception that since Generation Y practically grew up on Facebook, they would make the best candidates for marketing and communicating on social channels. Many times they are, says Long, but it's not always the case.

"Remember that the person you choose from within to handle your social media efforts will represent the public face of your company to many people," said Long. "Knowledge of the channel or technology, although necessary, represents only a small portion of the skill set required to take on such a mantle. When I’m looking around the office, I would rather identify the person who is engaging with customers daily, building brand loyalty and trust. I can easily teach the technology, but not as easily teach professional communications and marketing skills."

To read the full article, readers can visit NateLongMarketing.com.

About Nate Long Marketing

Nate Long Marketing is a strategic marketing consultancy that specializes in the integration of social, mobile, content and PR, as well as management of web design and development. Founder Nate Long has helped more than 100 businesses gain exposure, increase sales and build critical relationships with customers. For online marketing tips, visit NateLongMarketing.com and follow him on Twitter.

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