Next-Generation Provider Workforce Planning Analytic Model from The Chartis Group Addresses Physician Burnout

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“Why Your Provider Workforce Plan Isn’t Working” shows why health systems need to address the comprehensive needs of their provider workforce

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The Chartis Group released a report,“Why Your Provider Workforce Plan Isn’t Working.” Providers are the cornerstone of the health system, leading disease management and care delivery for patients and communities and serving as a primary engine for growth, strategic success, and care delivery transformation. Yet, for such an important strategic and operational asset, many health systems have a limited view into the comprehensive needs of their providers. This report provides an analysis of why current workforce plans are woefully insufficient, an analytic model that considers a wide range of next-generation factors, and an outline of the steps health system leaders should take to initiate the planning process.

System leaders must be able to address a broad set of questions and considerations covering expected retirement rates, recruitment gaps, reductions of clinical time or departures due to burnout, the impact of new care models for the diverse patient populations and the impact of technology-enabled care on the health system’s engagement of patients and providers. Rather than tackling these issues comprehensively at a system level, many hospitals and integrated networks rely on one-dimensional medical staff plans or, in the absence of a plan, reactively address provider challenges as they emerge.

Mark Werner, MD, Director, Clinical Consulting and the Chartis Physician Leadership Institute, and co-author of the paper noted, “Medical practice is under great pressure and rapidly changing. New care models and the evolving use of APPs and technology change the number of physicians needed and how they are engaged. Health systems must develop an extensive, system-wide provider workforce plan that incorporates all these variables.”

Overcoming the workforce planning challenges highlighted above requires a thoughtful system-wide discussion of the issues impacting each medical specialty. It is critical to have a common analytic understanding of the specialty current state. The analytic model must consider a wide range of next-generation factors including:

  • Demographic Changes by Sub-Market
  • Emerging Markets and Partnerships
  • Strategic Growth
  • Transition to Value-Based Care and Utilization Shifts
  • Dynamic Consumer Needs
  • Changing Patient Access Demands
  • Provider Aging and Retention
  • Varying Provider Productivity
  • Evolving Care Models

Workforce planning is both art and science. While the effort must be rooted in advanced, comprehensive analytics, qualitative factors must be woven together with the analytic results to model implications on provider recruitment, care model transformation, compensation plan redesign and operational improvement. Rather than ending the conversation with the analytic exercise, health system leaders should view workforce planning as a starting point to address the full set of issues facing providers.

About The Chartis Group
The Chartis Group (Chartis) provides comprehensive advisory services and analytics to the healthcare industry. With an unparalleled depth of expertise in strategic planning, performance excellence, informatics and technology, and health analytics, Chartis helps leading academic medical centers, integrated delivery networks, children’s hospitals and healthcare service organizations achieve transformative results. Chartis has offices in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, New York, Minneapolis, Portland and San Francisco. For more information, visit http://www.chartis.com.

Contact:
Jim Brown
National Marketing Director
The Chartis Group
jbrown@chartis.com
+1 312 932 3051

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