NICE Knowledge Exchange Conference to Focus on Challenges of Aging Population

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Knowledge transfer regarding elder abuse and senior suicides will be two featured topics at the annual National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly (NICE) Knowledge Exchange Conference on May 19th at Hart House, University of Toronto.

Enhancing and supporting networking and collaboration, as well as putting reputable research into practice, are essential in adapting to the unprecedented global aging trend, particularly with baby boomers now starting to reach 65.

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Abuse. Suicide. Poverty.

The aging population faces major challenges, and research networking is the vital connection to improving the health, wellbeing and care of present and future older adults, and healing the burgeoning issues.

Knowledge transfer regarding elder abuse and senior suicides will be two featured topics at the annual National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly (NICE) Knowledge Exchange Conference on Thursday, May 19, 2011 at Hart House, University of Toronto.

The interactive sessions will also focus on dementia, financial literacy and end-of-life issues. As well, the event will launch the private beta of the new cutting-edge social web platform, The Aging Application. This exciting new app, the first of its kind, will revolutionize aging and caregiving by providing immediate access to leading experts, factual knowledge and innovative care management tools, anywhere, anytime.

Keynote speaker Dr. Carole Estabrooks will present on global knowledge transfer and its critical role in helping to manage and enhance the aging experience through the translation and sharing of evidence-based interdisciplinary literature and research. Estabrooks holds the Canada Research Chair (2005-2015) in Knowledge Translation and is a member of the Advisory Board for CIHR’s Institute of Aging.

Dr. Marnin Heisel, a leading expert in the growing rate of suicide among older adults, will speak at the highly-regarded event hosted by NICE, a global knowledge transfer network comprised of foremost gerontological disciplines and professionals, including researchers, practitioners, students and seniors – all dedicated to prevention, research translation, education and setting care standards for older people.

“Enhancing and supporting networking and collaboration, as well as putting reputable research into practice, are essential in adapting to the unprecedented global aging trend, particularly with baby boomers now starting to reach 65,” says Dr. Lynn McDonald, founder and scientific director of NICE and a member of Canada’s Network for Centres of Excellence.

“There’s going to be a new sweep and changing profiles in health and social issues. We need to totally change how we operate - and we’ve hit on something that really works and empowers healthcare professionals, caregivers and the aging,” says McDonald, recipient of the Governor General’s Golden Jubilee Medal.

Early assessment and intervention are critical, especially for adults who themselves are aging while at the same time struggling with caring for their elderly parents, adds McDonald, who’s been instrumental in growing NICE from 40 partners to more than 1,450 academic and community members. “Positive response and requests speak to the pervasive need for reliable aging information,” she says. “In the past 18 months, NICE has responded to more than 300,000 requests for their invaluable pocket tools that address pervasive aging issues, including poverty, depression and the quality of dying while in nursing homes.”

Please join us or write about us! We need to get the word out and help our aging population in the later years of their lives.

About NICE

NICE is an international network of researchers, practitioners and students dedicated to improving the care of older adults, both in Canada and abroad. Its members represent a broad spectrum of disciplines and professions, including geriatric medicine, gerontological nursing, gerontological social work, gerontology, rehabilitation science, sociology, psychology, policy and law.

Through its international arm, the International Collaboration for the Care of the Elderly, NICE has researcher and student partners in nine countries: Australia, China, England, Germany, India, Israel, Scotland, South Africa and Switzerland.

About Dr. Lynn McDonald

  •     Professor
  •     B.A. Psychology, University of Manitoba
  •     M.S.W. University of Manitoba
  •     Ph.D. Sociology, University of Calgary
  •     Telephone: (416) 978-5714
  •     Fax: (416) 978-7072

Dr. McDonald is a professor in the Faculty of Social Work and Director of the Institute for the Life Course and Aging at the University of Toronto. She is the Scientific Director of an International Centre of Excellence, dedicated to the inter-professional care of older adults. Her research interests include work and retirement, gender and poverty, elder abuse and the older homeless. She is a co-author of a major Canadian textbook, Aging in Contemporary Canada, 2nd edition (2008), and a number of other books and articles including one of the first Canadian texts on elder abuse. In 2002 she was awarded the Governor General’s Golden Jubilee medal for her contributions to Canadian gerontology. In 2007 she received the Betty Havens Award in Longitudinal Research for her contributions to research in aging.

Media Contact:
Geoff Whitlock
416-919-6112
Geoff(at)socialinteractive(dot)ca

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