Many Hospitals Move to Color Coding Departments and Staff Members; blue sky scrubs Works to Accommodate the Many Requests

Recently, many hospitals have made a shift in uniform requirements. blue sky scrubs is working diligently to ensure that all of their clients who work in a hospital setting and are required to wear certain colors are able to order those colors from blue sky scrubs. blue sky scrubs is also offering a free scrub top to clients who order a scrub cap (details below.)

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blue sky scrubs adds many new colors to their existing scrub line.

Our clients decide our products. We have recently added to our scrub line many new colors, all of which have been suggestions from our clients. We are hoping to offer all of the colors requested by the end of the year.

Austin, TX (PRWEB) February 21, 2009

Recently, many hospitals such as those in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Presbyterian Hospital in Albuquerque, NM have made a shift in uniform requirements. Where nurses used to greet their pediatric patients with cheery Scooby Doo scrub tops, which would show that they are amicable and friendly to the children in that ward, they are now often required to wear one assigned solid color or a combination of two colors. While many would think this may stifle individuality, it has become a decision that many doctors, nurses, and other medical professional respect and support. Additionally, the patients are relieved by the changes as well. There aren't too many places people go that create the same level of anxiety and stress -- before even stepping inside -- as does a hospital. Having each department instantly recognizable helps the patient have confidence in the medical care he or she is about to receive.

Medical scrubs promote a clean, crisp image and first impressions are very important, not only in personal and business settings, but also in a hospital where a patient should feel as relaxed and at ease as is possible. Having the ability to distinguish between nurses, doctors, and other staff is key in easing a patient's mind and allowing for them to feel safe knowing who is caring for them and who to call on when they need medical attention.

Hospitals have made these changes not only for the patient's benefit, but also for the benefit of the staff. Choosing a nursing uniform is part of a medical professional's career that has immediate affects on those they work with as well as those they work around. For example, in emergency situations, the new requirement to wear color coordinated nursing scrubs can immediately give nurses and their colleagues a visual cue, alerting them to who they can call on for assistance even if they don't know their coworkers.

Nursing scrubs have been a significant part of the nursing field for over a century. Modern-day medical scrubs do not stop at functionality and are much more practical for today's faster paced society. Hospitals realize that a nurse is usually the first person someone sees when they enter the hospital, and often the last person they see on their way out. Having the new color requirement ensures the image hospitals are wanting to maintain and allowing nurses and other medical professional to be at ease knowing they are wearing the "right thing." Labor and Delivery Nurse Mary Elias says, "When I am getting ready for work, the last thing I need to think about is whether or not something looks 'good' on me or if it's not comfortable or if it matches. It's nice that the hospital where I work has chosen the color for me, as that's one less thing to think about in a very hectic and stressful department. All of my attention needs to be devoted to my patients and none of my attention needs to be worrying about what I am wearing." Elias also says, "Don't get me wrong - I do like to look and feel good at work, so I sometimes throw a little style in the mix and splurge on a pair of blue sky scrubs, instead of always wearing the scrubs the hospital provides."

At most hospitals, as long as the color is correct, the brand is the decision of the employee. However, many of these colors are not offered by all scrub manufacturers. blue sky scrubs CEO David Marquardt says, "Our clients decide our products. We have recently added to our scrub line many new colors, all of which have been suggestions from our clients. We are hoping to offer all of the colors requested by the end of the year." blue sky scrubs did not previously offer Royal Blue, a color required by Memorial Hermann in Houston, TX, but thanks to the many email requests from medical personnel, blue sky scrubs now carries the color. Another color request was "O.R. Green" or "Surgical Green," which is one of blue sky scrubs' most recent additions, thanks to the many requests from the Emergency Room staff at Brackenridge Hospital in Austin, TX. Pine Green (also called Hunter green), and Pink and Turquoise (for the staff members who work on a Labor and Delivery team in Houston, TX) are also colors requested by staff members who are required to be color-coded. When asked if there were any other pending scrub colors, Marquardt answered, "We have recently had a number of requests for 'Caribbean Blue' and, of all colors I would not have expected to offer, white. We are hoping to find our special fabric in Caribbean Blue and we are also hoping to find a white fabric that is resistant to stains." Marquardt also said, "blue sky scrubs is constantly working to ensure that everyone who orders our scrubs is 100% satisfied."

If you would like to receive a free scrub top with purchase, visit http://www.blueskyscrubs.com and add both a scrub hat and a Simple scrub top to your cart. During checkout, enter code BS1ST40 and your cart will be deducted the price of the Simple scrub top. This offer is good through February 28, 2009.

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