Start up Website eerily resembles the Facebook of Death

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Facebook and Google Buzz, there’s a new kid in town. Not to worry however, this particular forum of social networking is specific to our dearly departed.

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Facebook and Google Buzz, there’s a new kid in town. Not to worry however, this particular forum of social networking is specific to our dearly departed.

Glen Miller, President of ENotice, creators of http://www.deathnoticedirectory.com stated, “Facebook and Twitter have created a transparency in how people communicate and share their thoughts, interests and activities. We thought, why not duplicate that same transparency upon your passing. Memorialize, honour and share your loved one’s life in a dignified manner while accepting Memories and photos from visitors to your loved one’s Profile.”

Upon descent into the afterlife your life Profile can be created, edited, updated and can even receive posts from family and friends. The deathnoticedirectory.com has created a dignified website that is dedicated to as the site motto states, “Remembering Lives Lived”.

Miller adds, “One of our good friends recently lost a family member and posted an RIP message on her Facebook wall. Above her RIP message was a previous post made by her expressing what area of the house she enjoyed making love. The next subsequent post was an illustration of her Farmville score. I said to my wife, there has to be a more dignified way for people to share the loss of a family member.”

The result is http://www.deathnoticedirectory.com. Miller and his company are currently knocking on Funeral Home doors to adopt his website as the conventional mode of delivering Funeral Announcements. In an industry that is slow to change Miller concedes that this will be challenging.

Miller states, “The younger generation of Funeral Directors are certainly more adept at utilizing new technologies to the benefit of their business. The daughters and sons who are assuming control of the family business have grown up with Facebook and email, so we do have the younger generation’s inclination for all things internet working for us.”

The people at Enotice have a compelling story. The cost of a Profile on the Death Notice Directory is a fraction of the cost of a submission to a national publication with no time limitation. It also enables the family to assume control of the Profile continually with the ability to edit or update it at any time. They can create a 10,000 character biography, upload up to 32 photo memories and 4 videos, submit accept and approve condolence messages and even begin the construction of up to 10 predeceased family members Profiles in the Family Past element of the Profile.

From a corporate perspective, the Group Memorial element of the website is also a unique twist on how we remember the dead.

Miller laments, “We were talking to a gal we know who works in HR. We asked her if she or her company has ever considered creating a Wall of Remembrance dedicated to past employees that have passed away. She responded that no, that discussion had never came up. A wise man once said that a society should be judged on how they honour their dead. Yet, corporations, sporting teams, charitable organizations or any group working towards a common cause seldom properly honour the people that laid the foundation of its current success.”

The Group Memorial element of the website allows groups to create an account that enables them to celebrate the contributions of past members on a dedicated page detailing their years of service and accomplishments. The organization can update this page whenever a member passes away and post to their Facebook page as a notification to their Facebook Fans. Although death is not necessarily a part of life we wish to discuss or think about, it is a fact of life. Enabling individuals to express their love for predeceased individual’s while creating a dignified continuing tribute can only help us heal and move forward while, “Remembering Lives Lived”.

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Glen Miller
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