Onsemble 2007 Spring Conference Highlights Opportunities to Work Together

Share Article

For people concerned with excellence in cancer clinical research operations, the third face-to-face gathering of Onsemble built on past successes with more content, new breakout sessions, and the highest attendance to date. Presentations highlighted key industry trends affecting the community along with several opportunities for collaboration that are evolving.

News Image
I want to thank you very much for …the opportunity to speak to this community. This is a critical community to the cancer agenda and to the bioinformatics agenda specifically as we attempt to move forward and figure out how we are going to tackle what we all recognize as some of the most vexing problems associated with some of the next generation cancer research.

For people concerned with excellence in cancer clinical research operations, the third face-to-face gathering of Onsemble built on past successes with more content, new breakout sessions, and the highest attendance to date. Presentations highlighted key industry trends affecting the community along with several opportunities for collaboration that are evolving.

  • The third Onsemble conference was held at the National Conference Center in Lansdowne, VA from February 28 through March 2, 2007.

  • In attendance were 111 people representing 21 cancer centers, the NCI, AACI (Association of American Cancer Institutes), and CDISC (Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium).
  • Onsemble is a community comprised primarily of administrators, researchers, biostatisticians, clinicians, assistants, software developers, and other staff from 22 cancer centers nationwide.
  • This was the first conference that was opened up to representatives from organizations besides cancer centers and from cancer centers that don't currently use Oncore.
  • Guest speaker, Kenneth Buetow, Ph.D., Director of NCI's Center for Bioinformatics and head of the caBIG initiative, provided an overview of the current status of caBIG and took a look ahead. Having marked the end of their pilot phase, the caBIG community is now looking to further their presence in biomedical, clinical, and technology enterprises. In his presentation, Dr. Buetow mentioned several opportunities for synergies that exist between caBIG and Onsemble objectives.
  • Guest speaker, Lakshmi M. Grama, branch chief in charge of the National Cancer Institute's Physicians Data Query (PDQ(r)) database, gave a presentation on the benefits of registering clinical trials with the PDQ database.
  • Guest speaker, Dave DeMets, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, presented a case for Onsemble members to get involved with helping NIH define its emerging Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) grant program.
  • Guest speaker, Julie Evans, director of Technical Services at the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), outlined how the consortium has succeeded in developing global clinical data interchange standards that are ready for implementation and why this is important to clinical research operations.
  • Guest speaker, David Dilts, Ph.D., MBA, professor & director of the Center for Management Research in Healthcare at the Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University, illustrated how clinical research operations can identify operational inefficiency and how other industries have achieved better balance and increased productivity in spite of declining resources.
  • In addition to the five special guest speakers, members of the Onsemble community provided 14 presentations throughout the three-day conference.
  • Also new to this conference was a half-day reserved for concurrent breakout sessions. These sessions were provided to give smaller groups of people with similar job roles an opportunity to network and focus on topics specifically related to their job priorities.
  • Updates were given on three new collaborative efforts which were launched during the latter part of 2006 as part of a broader initiative to increase study accruals. These projects are the Oncore Patient Screening Database, Clinical Research Flowcharts, and Electronic Submission to the NCI PDQ database.
  • Many Onsemble(r) member cancer centers use Oncore(r), the industry leader in enterprise-class software for managing clinical trials and the flagship product of PercipEnz Technologies, Inc.

VIDEOS AVAILABLE ON ONSEMBLE.NET:

NCI's PDQ® Cancer Clinical Trials Registry - by Lakshmi Grama, NCI    

Cancer Centers' Role in CTSA - by Dr. Dave DeMets, University of Wisconsin - Madison    

Update on caBIG - by Kenneth Buetow, Ph.D.NCI

The Value of CDISC Standards for Data Exchange - by Julie Evans, CDISC

The Importance of Balanced Score Card Metrics for Clinical Centers - by David Dilts, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University    

Entering the Golden Age of Cancer Informatics - by Srini Kalluri, PercipEnz

QUOTES:

  • "Together, the Onsemble clinical research community and others like the caBIG technology community are in a unique position to redefine the way cancer research is conducted. By joining forces, these dedicated communities will produce a renaissance, bringing together innovators from many and varied organizations to leverage the collective, unique talents and specialties. The result will be a national infrastructure that will bring to life unprecedented advances in cancer research." - Srini Kalluri, President & CEO, PercipEnz Technologies, Inc.
  • "I'm really excited to be here to talk to you about how NCI's PDQ clinical trial registry…and the project we have launched with Oncore in terms of making things easier for cancer centers to register trials as well as for NCI to be able to fulfill its mission of making sure that patients and health professionals are aware of the full spectrum of cancer clinical trials that are going on in the country." - Lakshmi M. Grama, Branch Chief, International Cancer Research Databank Branch. Office of Cancer Content Management. Office of Communications, NCI/NIH.
  • "If we don't get involved as cancer centers in the CTSA activity, it will go on, it will have a life of its own and eventually it may have something to do with how we conduct cancer research. And so, it would be a shame if we weren't in there sharing our experiences, sharing our expertise and sharing our methodologies. Cancer centers should be very aggressive and active in working with their CTSA colleagues." - David DeMets, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • "I want to thank you very much for …the opportunity to speak to this community. This is a critical community to the cancer agenda and to the bioinformatics agenda specifically as we attempt to move forward and figure out how we are going to tackle what we all recognize as some of the most vexing problems associated with some of the next generation cancer research." - Kenneth Buetow, Ph.D., Director, NCI Center for Bioinformatics, NCI/NIH.
  • "One of the things that happens in the environment in which cancer centers operate now is that resources are becoming increasingly constrained which means that you don't have time for things to sit around and wait." - David Dilts, Ph.D., MBA. Professor & Director, Management of Technology Program, School of Engineering and Professor & Director, Center of Management Research in Healthcare, Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Kerri Phillips
Visit website