Parallax Art Fair: Judy Chicago Contributor Exhibits in New York’s First Non-art Fair

Share Article

Original Artist of Famous “Dinner Party” Showing Work in Parallax Art Fair at The Prince George, May 11-12.

Parallax Art Fair
Part of the intention of the ‘Dinner Party’ was to rewrite art history so that women are made visible and equally important to the male dominated art world. Judy did what you suggest: she created her own community.

With her unassuming modesty and intelligence, Meredith Dalglish is no ordinary artist from Portland Oregon. She was an original contributor to Judy Chicago’s 1979 feminist installation work ‘Dinner Party’ now on permanent display at the Brooklyn Museum, New York. Dalglish, an exhibitor in Parallax ‘Art’ Fair at The Prince George Ballroom in New York 11-12 May, said of her contribution to Chicago’s famous work: “I volunteered for 7 months to help Judy get this monumental installation finished. It was my job to take her image based on her fine drawing and translate it into clay to celebrate the life and work of Georgia O'Keeffe.” Aware of the problems of art history and appreciating the issues that Parallax raises, she added, “Part of the intention of the ‘Dinner Party’ was to rewrite art history so that women are made visible and equally important to the male dominated art world. Judy did what you suggest: she created her own community. I have always been involved with early female imagery, such as that in my large scale permanent ceramic installation entitled ‘Aphrodite's Dream’ at the downtown Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, GA. created in time for the Olympics held there in 1997. Triangles are a repeated theme in my work, that will also be represented at the upcoming Parallax Art Fair, as this is a healing, spiritual and feminine image."

Along with Dalglish’s work, over 120 international artists with 2000 pieces will exhibit at the beautifully-restored Neo-Renaissance ballroom. Uniquely described as a non-art fair, Parallax highlights alternative ideas about art objects. Keeping the rental fees low, taking no commission on sales and employing artists, by hiring the venue, Parallax also contributes to Common Ground, a charity that helps war veterans and homeless in New York. “It is an important aspect for us,” says Dr Chris Barlow, owner and a British artist. “Not every person or artist grasps the egalitarian spirit of PAF. But I’m a great believer that it is possible to work for higher goals in the art world than simply dollars or position. Artists have the power to change the industry together if we can unpick the hierarchies we’ve inherited from Art History.” Deliberately held at the same time as Frieze Art Fair, the event also features New Zealand artist Gill Gatfield’s installation “Vanity Fair” with its glowing vanity license plate on black velvet, as well as Rebecca Ronesi’s paintings incorporating Silver Dragonflies and the activist-work of Anthony C and Karen M, who will be “installing” street art.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

George Leonard

George Leonard
Follow us on
Visit website