Pepper Spray Is A Nonlethal Weapon Worth Having Reveals The New Absolute Rights Newsletter

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The new Absolute Rights newsletter discusses how pepper spray can be used as a nonlethal weapon.

Pepper Spray Is A Nonlethal Weapon AbsoluteRights.com

Pepper Spray Is A Nonlethal Weapon AbsoluteRights.com

States that have restrictions on pepper spray are the ones you'd expect: New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Wisconsin, California, Washington D.C., and Hawaii.

The recent Absolute Rights newsletter discusses the use of pepper spray as a nonlethal weapon as protection for people that do not want to carry lethal weapons. Pepper spray is a less-than-lethal weapon popular with police officers, security guards, and many private citizens, and for good reason, explains the new Absolute Rights newsletter.

Today’s Absolute Rights newsletter talks about the [proper use of pepper spray, which can temporarily disable an assailant and give the victim an opportunity to leave the area or call for help. It's an effective yet safe preventative response to certain threats that people may face, reveals the Absolute Right newsletter.

Most states allow citizens to carry such devices for self-defense purposes, explains the newest Absolute Rights newsletter, and states that have restrictions on pepper spray are the ones you'd expect: New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Wisconsin, California, Washington D.C., and Hawaii. Restrictions vary regarding the chemical components that are allowed, explains the new Absolute Rights newsletter, the concentration, and even the labeling used.

Call local law enforcement and ask before traveling, if it is not possible to find a local or state government website that spells out the law advises the recent Absolute Rights newsletter. Be aware remarks the new Absolute Rights newsletter that talking with local or state government officials can be frustrating conversations, because most of the people don't respect personal responsibility and are never excited about someone bringing "weapons" into their city.

Chemical sprays are one of the best means of non-lethal self-defense on the market, reveals the new Absolute Rights newsletter, but the concept of chemically disabling an enemy has been around for a long, long time. In fact, the recent Absolute Rights newsletter explains the Chinese first used red pepper as a weapon about 300 B.C., and ancient Japanese warriors threw rice sacks filled with red pepper to burn their enemies' eyes, nose and mouth. Chemical agents were used in America as far back as the Civil War. says the new Absolute Rights newsletter.

More recently, the new Absolute Rights newsletter explains mace became popular with police departments in the 1970's; and in the early 1980's, Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) became the chemical spray of choice. OC is called "pepper spray" because it's made from the resin of cayenne pepper, reveals the new Absolute Rights newsletter. To work it must be sprayed into an attacker's eyes, nose or mouth, where it causes severe shortness of breath, involuntary closing of the eyes, extreme tearing, headache, and sometimes nausea, explains the new Absolute Rights newsletter.

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Jon Tarr
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