Dr. Rod J. Rohrich Delivers Keynote Address on the Future of Rhinoplasty

At the 18th Annual National Meeting of The Rhinoplasty Society, Dallas plastic surgeon Dr. Rod J. Rohrich encourages colleagues to push the boundaries of rhinoplasty toward greater individualization, better results, and lesser risk.

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Dr. Rod Rohrich

Rod J. Rohrich, M.D.

Rhinoplasty has evolved tremendously over the past decade but remains one of the most difficult plastic surgery procedures. It takes great finesse and years to master.

Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) June 20, 2013

Presenting at the 18th Annual National Meeting of The Rhinoplasty Society, society president and keynote speaker Dr. Rod J. Rohrich analyzed the past, present and future of rhinoplasty (plastic surgery of the nose) for rhinoplasty surgeons visiting the city from across the nation. In his address, Dr. Rohrich outlined the progression from past closed-technique non-individualized rhinoplasty to current open-technique rhinoplasty that reduces risk and preserves a patient’s unique look. According to Rohrich, future techniques will increase options for treatment as well as the success of individual results.

Dr. Rohrich, a leader in the teaching and advancement of rhinoplasty, is Professor and Chairman of The Department of Plastic Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

In his address, titled “Rhinoplasty - Where are We Going?”, Dr. Rohrich emphasized phenomenal advancements in rhinoplasty surgery. Dr. Rohrich explained how these advances have allowed plastic surgeons who specialize in rhinoplasty to better serve patients and reduce the need for revision rhinoplasty, which can be difficult and generally has a lower success rate.

“Rhinoplasty has evolved tremendously over the past decade but remains one of the most difficult plastic surgery procedures. It takes great finesse and years to master,” says Dr. Rohrich. “The number of rhinoplasty experts is shrinking because of its complexity, but it is also one of the most rewarding procedures.”

Many of Dr. Rohrich's patients come from referrals from other plastic surgeons who have chosen not to develop expertise in rhinoplasty due to its complexity. Also, according to Dr. Rohrich, more than half of his rhinoplasty patients see him for secondary rhinoplasty as a result of the advanced techniques he uses.

In his keynote, Dr. Rohrich reviewed past, present, and future rhinoplasty goals and techniques. The review showed that rhinoplasty over the years has become more focused on individual needs and unique look of the patient, even while promoting techniques that assure consistent quality.

Some of the highlights of his review are:

Rhinoplasty of the Past

  •     Surgeons used vastly different techniques from one another. However, they practiced a chosen technique with such great consistency that every patient’s nose looked similar, and surgeons became known for the type of nose they were able to achieve.
  •     Little study of ethnic features or personal facial features when planning procedures.
  •     Varying ideas of what an ideal nose should look like.
  •     Rhinoplasty was typically performed using the closed approach, during which surgeons cannot see or access underlying nasal structures. This type of procedure often involved guesswork, and results were not very consistent.

Rhinoplasty of the Present

  •     Each rhinoplasty surgeon masters a wide variety of techniques to shape noses according to each patient’s specific situation.
  •     The goal of rhinoplasty is not to produce a specific type of ideal nose shape, but to make sure the shape harmonizes with the person’s face.
  •     Doctors carefully consider ethnic features and unique facial features for each procedure.
  •     Rhinoplasty is typically performed using the open approach, during which surgeons have direct access to underlying nasal structures. This type of procedure allows for much more consistent results.

Rhinoplasty of the Future

  •     Dermal fillers will help shape the nose in a non-surgical manner for minor or temporary changes that don’t warrant the risks of surgery. In some cases, this technique can also be used to demonstrate expected results before surgery, so patients can "try it out."
  •     The use of biodegradable constructs will allow for the development of new surgical techniques not previously available. These structures add support, are inert to the patient, and slowly dissolve as they are replaced by the patient’s own natural tissues over time.
  •     Doctors will use 3D computer imaging for better, more accurate preoperative analysis.
  •     Rhinoplasty practitioners will more drastically reposition innate nasal tissues, using a person's own tissues to build surgical constructs. Many plastic surgeons currently use ear cartilage, rib cartilage and forehead skin flaps, but more exotic tissues and locations may be used in the future.

Dr. Rohrich said the ultimate goal of The Rhinoplasty Society and plastic surgeons who practice rhinoplasty should be to use open-technique rhinoplasty to dramatically reduce the need for corrective procedures, as well as move even further away from the non-individualized rhinoplasty of the past.

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About Rod J. Rohrich, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Dr. Rod J. Rohrich holds the Betty and Warren Woodward Chair in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center. He also holds the UT Southwestern Medical Center Crystal Charity Ball Distinguished Chair in Plastic Surgery. Dr. Rohrich graduated from Baylor College of Medicine with high honors, and completed residencies at the University of Michigan Medical Center and fellowships at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard (hand/microsurgery) and Oxford University (pediatric plastic surgery). He has served as president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the largest organization of board certified plastic surgeons in the world. He repeatedly has been selected by his peers as one of America's best doctors, and twice has received one of his profession's highest honors, the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes his contributions to education in plastic surgery. Dr. Rohrich participates in and has led numerous associations and councils for the advancement of plastic and reconstructive surgery. He is a native of North Dakota and is married to Dr. Diane Gibby, also a plastic surgeon and they live in Dallas with their two children.


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