Dr. Rohrich Presents on Secondary Plastic Surgery at the Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Symposium

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With an emphasis on secondary plastic surgery, Dallas plastic surgeon Dr. Rod J. Rohrich shares latest techniques and developments in cosmetic plastic surgery last month at the 42nd annual Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Symposium in Toronto.

Rod Rohrich secondary rhinoplasty

Secondary rhinoplasty can correct unsuccessful results of a previous rhinoplasty.

Rhinoplasty is a surgery of millimeters, as the margin of error is very small. It truly epitomizes plastic surgery as a whole because it is a surgery of such great finesse and it takes years to master.

Presenting on topics covering the correction of facelifts and secondary rhinoplasty, Dr. Rod J. Rohrich presented a series of lectures at the 42nd annual Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Symposium in Toronto last month. Dr. Rohrich, a Dallas plastic surgeon and chairman of the Department of Plastic Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center, is an international expert on secondary cosmetic surgery and lectures frequently in teaching symposia around the world.

Dr. Rohrich has carefully developed a method of revising secondary facelifts using what he refers to as "Four R's" of correction: Resect the scars, Refill the face, Reshape the skin and deep layers and Restore the normal natural contours. His approach is designed to restore the natural and youthful appearance and correct the often unnatural or windswept look that can occur as an unwanted result in some facelifts.

Dr. Rohrich also lectured on secondary rhinoplasty which he considers among the most challenging procedures performed in plastic surgery. "Rhinoplasty is a surgery of millimeters, as the margin of error is very small. It truly epitomizes plastic surgery as a whole because it is a surgery of such great finesse and it takes years to master," explains Dr. Rohrich. More than half of Dr. Rohrich's rhinoplasty patients come to see him for revision rhinoplasty after having unsatisfactory results from a previous surgery.

The approach Dr. Rohrich uses in corrective rhinoplasty is very analytical. It involves careful analysis of the nose and deep evaluation of the patient's expectations and goals. Surgically, Dr. Rohrich prefers to use the open approach in which he will have direct visual feedback on the internal structures of the nose and advocates using autologous grafts, that is, using the patients own tissue when additional supporting structures are needed.

The lectures given by Dr. Rohrich at this meeting included "Rhinoplasty - Getting it Right the First Time," "The Lift and Fill Facelift - The Role of Fat Compartments in Facial Rejuvenation," and "Secondary Rhinoplasty - Challenges and the Future." Dr. Rohrich also presented on how malar fat compartments play a key role in procedures complementary to facelifts such as blepharoplasty.

About Rod J. Rohrich, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Dr. Rod J. Rohrich holds the Betty and Warren Woodward Chair in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. He also holds the UT Southwestern Medical Center Crystal Charity Ball Distinguished Chair in Plastic Surgery. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine with high honors, and completed residencies at the University of Michigan Medical Center and fellowships at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard (hand/microsurgery) and Oxford University (pediatric plastic surgery). He has served as president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and currently serves as president of the Rhinoplasty Society. He repeatedly has been selected by his peers as one of America's best doctors, and twice has received one of his profession's highest honors, the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes his contributions to education in his field. Dr. Rohrich participates in and has led numerous associations and councils for the advancement of plastic and reconstructive surgery. He is a native of North Dakota and is married to Dr. Diane Gibby, also a plastic surgeon. They live in Dallas with their two children.

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