Getting Water To The Fixtures: The Supply Lines

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Mr Rooter's Tip Of The Day: The supply lines need not be pitched, because the water in them is under pressure.

plumbing supply lines
Water under pressure will move in any direction; with Ts, elbows and angled fittings–run around corners, ducts and other obstacles.

“Supplying a bathroom with hot and cold water is much easier than running pipes for wastes and drains,” says Bob Beall, president of Mr Rooter Plumbing. The supply lines need not be pitched, because the water in them is under pressure, according to the most referred plumber in the Northeast Ohio and Southwest Pennsylvania regions.

Household plumbing supply lines under pressure will move in any direction; with Ts, elbows and angled fittings–run around corners, ducts and other obstacles. Beall’s advice is to avoid what plumbers call “trapping the line”, that is, “running the pipes in a U shape that can trap water when you drain the system for repairs or for winter months when a summer place is empty.”

“Choose plastic pipe material if the code permits and make cemented connections; copper is the most durable,” says Mr. Rooter. Along with the material chosen,m the code will dictate pipe sizes. Always run hot and cold lines parallel to each other and at least 6 inches apart, and fasten them to studs or joists every 6 to 8 feet with pipe clamps.

Choose the route strategically and locate the shutoff valves that control the mains you will be cutting. Mr. Rooter recommends that before soldering a new fitting to a cut copper pipe, “poke a rag into the opened end to dry it out.” If moisture remains in the line and prevents clean soldering, stuff a bit of stale bread into the wet pipe to absorb the moisture while soldering. (The bread will disintegrate and flow out of the pipes through the taps when the house water supply is restored.)

Mr. Rooter’s Tip Of The Day

Tapping The Supply Line

Tip #1 Shut off the water supply and drain the branch to be tapped.

Tip #2 Cut out an 8-inch section of copper supply pipe.

Tip #3 Install a T, angled to receive the first section of the new run, to one of the cut ends and slide a slip coupling over the other. Cut a spacer to fill the remaining opening (the section of pipe getting cut out may be shortened.)

Tip #4 Slip one end of the spacer into the T and set the other against the cut edge of the supply pipe, then slide the slip coupling over the joint, center it and solder it in place.

Tip #5 Solder the spacer and the T.

BONUS TIP: To tap into galvanized steel pipe (inset), remove a section of the pipe between the fittings and replace it with an assembly consisting of two lengths of copper tubing and a T. Attach the tubing to the galvanized pipe with transition fittings.

Mr. Rooter’s Daily Tips are provided by Mr. Rooter Plumbing.
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Rooter (Pittsburgh)

Robert A. Beall
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